Une histoire d'un dicton populaire

2,858
vues
7
réponses
Dernier message fait il y a environ 10 ans par Christine925
wmmeden
  • Créé par
  • wmmeden
  • United States Super Hero 1204
  • actif la dernière fois il y a environ 10 mois

Les lecteurs de ce sujet ont également lu :

  • Coinbets777 - Jetons Gratuits Exclusifs Uniquement pour les nouveaux joueurs - US OK ! 25$ de Jetons Gratuits Comment réclamer le bonus : Les joueurs doivent s'inscrire via notre LIEN , aller à la...

    Lu

    Coinbets777 - Jetons Gratuits Exclusifs

    1 631
    il y a environ 2 mois
  • ComeOn.nl Casino - Kings Day - Offre de bienvenue de 400 tours gratuits. Conditions générales des bonus : • Le bonus de bienvenue est destiné aux nouveaux joueurs âgés de 24 ans ou plus. •...

    Lu

    Promotions du casino ComeOn.nl

    1 642
    il y a environ 2 mois
  • Posh n'a pas payé et j'ai attendu pendant tout ce temps. J'ai gagné 1 400,00 le 6 mai au Posh Casino. J'y joue depuis quelques années et je m'en suis déjà retiré auparavant. J'ai utilisé le...

    Lu

    FERMÉ [En raison du manque de réponse du...

    12 814
    il y a environ 2 mois

Veuillez ou s'inscrire pour poster ou commenter.

  • Original Anglais Traduction Français

    These must be from all over, because I haven't heard some of these and I live in the US

    A

    ACHILLES HEEL

    In Greek mythology Thetis dipped her son in the mythical River Styx. Anyone who was immersed in the river became invulnerable. However Thetis held Achilles by his heel. Since her hand covered this part of his body the water did not touch it and so it remained vulnerable. Achilles was eventually killed when an arrow hit his heel.

    AM I MY BROTHERS KEEPER?

    Like many old sayings in the English language this one come from the Bible. In Genesis Cain murdered his brother Abel. God asked Cain 'Where is your brother?'. Cain answered 'I don't know. Am I my brothers keeper?'.

    APPLE OF MY EYE

    This phrase also comes from the Bible. In Psalm 17:8 the writer asks God 'keep me as the apple of your eye'.

    B

    BAKERS DOZEN


    A bakers dozen means thirteen. This old saying is said to come from the days when bakers were severely punished for baking underweight loaves. Some added a loaf to a batch of a dozen to be above suspicion.

    BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH

    When hunting birds some people would beat about the bush to drive them out into the open. Other people would than catch the birds. 'I won't beat about the bush' came to mean 'I will go straight to the point without any delay'.

    ON YOUR BEAM ENDS

    On a ship the beams are horizontal timbers that stretch across the ship and support the decks. If you are on your beam-ends your ship is leaning at a dangerous angle. In other words you are in a precarious situation.

    BEE LINE


    In the past people believed that bees flew in a straight line to their hive. So if you made a bee line for something you went straight for it.

    BEYOND THE PALE

    Originally a pale was an area under the authority of a certain official. In the 14th and 15th centuries the English king ruled Dublin and the surrounding area known as the pale. Anyone 'beyond the pale' was seen as savage and dangerous.

    BIG WIG

    In the 18th century when many men wore wigs, the most important men wore the biggest wigs. Hence today important people are called big wigs.

    BITE THE BULLET

    This old saying means to grin and bear a painful situation. It comes from the days before anaesthetics. A soldier about to undergo an operation was given a bullet to bite.

    THE BITER BEING BITTEN

    This old saying has nothing to do with animals. In the 17th century a biter was a con man. 'Talk about the biter being bitten' was originally a phrase about a con man being beaten at his own game.

    BITES THE DUST

    This phrase comes from a translation of the epic Ancient Greek poem the Iliad about the war between the Greeks and the Trojans. It was poetic way of describing the death of a warrior.

    BITTER END

    Anchor cable was wrapped around posts called bitts. The last piece of cable was called the bitter end. If you let out the cable to the bitter end there was nothing else you could do, you had reached the end of your resources.

    THE BLIND LEADING THE BLIND

    In Matthew 15:14 Jesus criticised the Pharisees, the religious authorities of his day, saying 'they be blind leaders of the blind'.

    BLUE-BLOOD

    This means aristocratic. For centuries the Arabs occupied Spain but they were gradually forced out during the Middle Ages. The upper class in Spain had paler skin than most of the population as their ancestors had not inter-married with the Arabs. As they had pale skin the 'blue' blood running through their veins was more visible. (Of course all blood is red but it sometimes looks blue when running through veins). So blue-blooded came to mean upper class.

    BOBBIES, PEELERS

    Both these nicknames for policemen come from Sir Robert Peel who founded the first modern police force in 1829.

    TO BOOT

    If you get something to boot it means you get it extra. However it has nothing to do with boots you wear on your feet. It is a corruption of the old word bot, which meant profit or advantage.

    BORN WITH A SILVER SPOON IN YOUR MOUTH

    Once when a child was christened it was traditional for the godparents to give a silver spoon as a gift (if they could afford it!). However a child born in a rich family did not have to wait. He or she had it all from the start. They were 'born with a silver spoon in their mouth'.

    A BROKEN REED

    This phrase is from Isaiah 36: 6. When the Assyrians laid siege to Jerusalem one of them stood outside the walls and asked if they hoped for help from Egypt. He described Egypt as a 'broken reed'.

    C

    CHAP

    This word is derived from the old word Chapman that meant merchant or trader. It in turn was derived from ceapman. The old word ceap meant to sell.

    CHOCK-A-BLOCK

    When pulleys or blocks on sailing ship were pulled so tightly together that they could not be moved any closer together they were said to be chock-a-block.

    COALS TO NEWCASTLE

    Before railways were invented goods were often transported by water. Coal was transported by ship from Newcastle to London by sea. It was called sea coal. Taking coals to Newcastle was obviously a pointless exercise.

    COCK A HOOP

    This phrase comes from a primitive tap called a spile and shive. A shive was a wooden tube at the bottom of a barrel and a spile was a wooden bung. You removed the shive to let liquid flow out and replaced it to stop the flow. The spile was sometimes called a cock. If people were extremely happy and wanted to celebrate they took out the cock and put in on the hoop on the top of the barrel to let the drink flow out freely. So it was cock a hoop. So cock a hoop came to mean ecstatic.

    CODSWALLOP

    In the 19th century wallop was slang for beer. A man named Codd began selling lemonade and it was called Codswallop. In time codswallop began to mean anything worthless or inferior and later anything untrue.

    CLOUD CUCKOO LAND

    This phrase comes from a play called The Birds by the Greek dramatist Aristophanes (c.448-385 BC). In the play the birds decide to build a utopian city called Cloud cuckoo city.

    COPPER

    The old word cop meant grab or capture so in the 19th century policemen were called coppers because they grabbed or caught criminals.

    CROCODILE TEARS


    These are an insincere display of grief or sadness. It comes from the old belief that a crocodile wept (insincerely!) if it killed and ate a man.

    CUT AND RUN

    In an emergency rather than haul up an anchor the sailors would cut the anchor cable then run with the wind.

    D

    THE DEVIL TO PAY

    Originally this old saying was 'the devil to pay and no hot pitch'. In a sailing ship a devil was the seam between planks. This had to be made waterproof. Fibres from old ropes were first hammered into the seam and then pitch (a tar-like substance) was poured (or paid) onto it. If you had the devil to pay and no hot pitch you were in trouble.

    WHAT THE DICKENS!

    This old saying does not come from the writer Charles Dickens (1812-1870). It is much older than him! It has been around since at least the 16th century. Originally 'Dickens' was another name for the Devil.

    DIFFERENT KETTLE OF FISH

    In the past a kettle was not necessarily a device to boil water to make a cup of tea. A pot for boiling food (like fish) was also called a kettle. Unfortunately nobody really knows why we say 'a different kettle of fish'.

    DON'T LOOK A GIFT HORSE IN THE MOUTH

    This old saying means don't examine a gift too closely! You can tell a horse’s age by looking at its teeth, which is why people 'looked a horse in the mouth'.

    DOUBTING THOMAS

    This phrase comes from John 20: 24-27. After his resurrection Jesus appeared to his disciples. However one of them, named Thomas, was absent. When the others told him that Jesus was alive Thomas said he would not believe until he saw the marks on Jesus’ hands and the wound in his side caused by a Roman spear. Jesus appeared again and told Thomas ‘Stop doubting and believe!’

    DOWN AT HEEL

    If the heels of your shoes were worn down you had a shabby appearance.

    DUTCH COURAGE

    In the 17th century England and Holland were rivals. They fought wars in 1652-54, 1665-67 and 1672-74. It was said (very unfairly) that the Dutch had to drink alcohol to build up their courage. Other insulting phrases are Dutch treat (meaning you pay for yourself) and Double Dutch meaning gibberish.

    DYED IN THE WOOL

    Wool that was dyed before it was woven kept its colour better than wool dyed after weaving of 'dyed in the piece'.

    E

    EARMARKED

    This comes from the days when livestock had their ears marked so their owner could be easily identified.

    EAT DRINK AND BE MERRY

    This old saying is from Ecclesiastes 8:15 'a man has no better thing under the sun than to eat and to drink and be merry'.

    ESCAPED BY THE SKIN OF YOUR TEETH

    This phrase comes from the Bible, from Job 19:20.

    F

    FAST AND LOOSE

    Traditionally it you wanted archers to halt and not shoot arrows you shouted 'fast!'. Archers also 'loosed' arrows. So if you played fast and loose you said one thing and did another.

    FEET OF CLAY

    If a person we admire has a fatal weakness we say they have feet of clay. This phrase comes from the Bible. King Nebuchadnezzar dreamed of a statue. It had a head of gold, arms and chest of silver, belly and thighs of bronze and it legs were of iron. However its feet were made of a mixture of iron and clay. A rock hit the statue's feet and the whole statue was broken. The prophet Daniel interpreted the dream to be about a series of empires, all of which would eventually be destroyed. (Daniel 2:27-44).

    FIDDLE WHILE ROME BURNS

    There is a legend that when Rome burned in 64 AD Emperor Nero played the lyre (not the fiddle!). Historians are sceptical about the story.

    FLASH IN THE PAN

    Muskets had a priming pan, which was filled with gunpowder. When flint hit steel it ignited the powder in the pan, which in turn ignited the main charge of gunpowder and fired the musket ball. However sometimes the powder in the pan failed to light the main charge. In that case you had a flash in the pan.

    FLY IN THE OINTMENT

    This old saying comes from the Bible. In Ecclesiastes 10:1 the writer says that dead flies give perfume a bad smell (in old versions of the Bible the word for perfume is translated 'ointment').

    FLYING COLOURS

    If a fleet won a clear victory the ships would sail back to port with their colours proudly flying from their masts.

    FREELANCE

    In the Middle Ages freelances were soldiers who fought for anyone who would hire them. They were literally free lances.

    FROM THE HORSES'S MOUTH

    You can tell a horse’s age by examining its teeth. A horse dealer may lie to you but you can always find out the truth 'from the horse’s mouth'.

    G

    GET THE SACK

    This comes from the days when workmen carried their tools in sacks. If your employer gave you the sack it was time to collect your tools and go.

    GILD THE LILY

    This phrase is from King John by William Shakespeare. 'To gild refined gold, to paint the lily is wasteful and ridiculous excess'.

    GIVE SOMEBODY THE COLD SHOULDER

    When an unwanted visitor came you gave them cold shoulder of mutton instead of hot meat as a hint that they were not to call again.

    GO THE EXTRA MILE

    By law a Roman soldier could force anybody to carry his equipment 1 mile. In Matthew 5:41 Jesus told his followers 'if somebody forces you to go 1 mile go 2 miles with him'.

    GO TO POT

    Any farm animal that had outlived its usefulness such as a hen that no longer laid eggs would literally go to pot. It was cooked and eaten.

    GOLLY, GOSH

    In the past it wasn't polite to use the exclamation 'God!' Instead people said Golly! or Gosh! Sometimes they said 'heck' instead of Hell.

    GOODBYE

    This is a contraction of the words God be with ye (you).

    H

    HAT TRICK

    This comes from cricket. Once a bowler who took three wickets in successive deliveries was given a new hat by his club.

    HIDING YOUR LIGHT UNDER A BUSHEL

    A bushel was a container for measuring grain. In Matthew 15:15 Jesus said 'Neither do men light a candle and put it under a bushel but on a candlestick'.

    HOBSONS CHOICE

    This means to have no choice at all. In the 16th century and the early 17th century if you went on a journey you could hire a horse to take you from one town to another and travel using a relay of horses. (That was better than wearing out your own horse on a long journey over very poor roads). In the early 1600s Thomas Hobson was a man in Cambridge who hired out horses. However he would not let customers choose which horse they wanted to ride. Instead they had to ride whichever horse was nearest the stable entrance. So if you hired a horse from him you were given 'Hobson's choice'.

    HOIST BY YOUR OWN PETARD

    A petard was a type of Tudor bomb. It was a container of gunpowder with a fuse, which was placed against a wooden gate. Sometimes all things did not go to plan and the petard exploded prematurely blowing you into the air. You were hoist by your own petard.

    HOLIER THAN THOU

    This comes from the Bible, Isaiah 65:5, the Old Testament prophet berates people who say 'stand by thyself, come not near me for I am holier than thou'.

    HONEYMOON

    This is derived from honey month. It was an old tradition that newly weds drank mead (which is made from honey) for a month after the wedding.

    BY HOOK OR BY CROOK

    This old saying probably comes from a Medieval law which stated that peasants could use branches of trees for fire wood if they could reach them with their shepherds crook or their billhook.

    HUMBLE PIE

    The expression to eat humble pie was once to eat umble pie. The umbles were the intestines or less appetising parts of an animal and servants and other lower class people ate them. So if a deer was killed the rich ate venison and those of low status ate umble pie. In time it became corrupted to eat humble pie and came to mean to debase yourself or act with humility.

    K

    KICK THE BUCKET

    When slaughtering a pig you tied its back legs to a wooden beam (in French buquet). As the animal died it kicked the buquet.

    KNOW THE ROPES

    On a sailing ship it was essential to know the ropes.

    KNUCKLE UNDER

    Once knuckle meant any joint, including the knee. To knuckle under meant to kneel in submission.

    L

    LAMB TO THE SLAUGHTER

    This is from Isaiah 53:7 'He is brought as a lamb to the slaughter'. Later this verse was applied to Jesus.

    RESTING ON YOUR LAURELS, LOOK TO YOUR LAURELS

    In the ancient world winning athletes and other heroes and distinguished people were given wreaths of laurel leaves. If you are resting on your laurels you are relying on your past achievements. If you need to look to your laurels it means you have competition.

    A LEOPARD CANNOT CHANGE HIS SPOTS

    This is another old saying from the Bible. This one comes from Jeremiah 13:23 'Can an Ethiopian change his skin or a leopard his spots?'.

    LET THE CAT OUT OF THE BAG

    This old saying is probably derived from the days when people who sold piglets in bags sometimes put a cat in the bag instead. If you let the cat out of the bag you exposed the trick.

    LICK INTO SHAPE

    In the Middle Ages people thought that bear cubs were born shapeless and their mother literally licked them into shape.

    LILY LIVERED

    Means cowardly. People once believed that your passions came from you liver. If you were lily livered your liver was white (because it did not contain any blood). So you were a coward.

    A LITTLE BIRD TOLD ME

    This old saying comes from the Bible. In Ecclesiastes 10:20 the writer warns us not to curse the king or the rich even in private or a 'bird of the air' may report what you say.

    A LONG SHOT

    A long shot is an option with only a small chance of success. In the past guns were only accurate at short range. So a 'long shot' (fired over a long distance) only had a small chance of hitting its target.

    LONG IN THE TOOTH

    When a horse grows old its gums recede and if you examine its mouth it looks 'long in the tooth'.

    Ceux-ci doivent venir de partout, car je n'en ai pas entendu certains et j'habite aux États-Unis.

    UN

    TALON D'ACHILLE

    Dans la mythologie grecque, Thétis a plongé son fils dans le mythique fleuve Styx. Quiconque était immergé dans la rivière devenait invulnérable. Cependant Thétis tenait Achille par le talon. Comme sa main recouvrait cette partie de son corps, l'eau ne la touchait pas et elle restait donc vulnérable. Achille fut finalement tué lorsqu'une flèche toucha son talon.

    SUIS-JE LE GARDIEN DE MES FRÈRES ?

    Comme beaucoup de vieux dictons en anglais, celui-ci vient de la Bible. Dans la Genèse, Caïn assassina son frère Abel. Dieu a demandé à Caïn : « Où est ton frère ? ». Caïn répondit : « Je ne sais pas. Suis-je le gardien de mon frère ?

    PRUNELLE DE MES YEUX

    Cette phrase vient également de la Bible. Dans le Psaume 17 :8, l’auteur demande à Dieu de « me garder comme la prunelle de tes yeux ».

    B

    UNE DOUZAINE DE BOULANGERS


    Une douzaine de boulangers signifie treize. Ce vieux dicton viendrait de l’époque où les boulangers étaient sévèrement punis pour avoir cuisiné des pains de poids insuffisant. Certains ajoutaient un pain à un lot d’une douzaine pour être au-dessus de tout soupçon.

    Battre autour du pot

    Lorsqu'ils chassaient les oiseaux, certains tournaient autour du pot pour les chasser à l'air libre. D'autres personnes attraperaient les oiseaux. « Je ne tourne pas autour du pot » signifiait désormais : « J'irai droit au but sans tarder ».

    AUX EXTRÉMITÉS DE VOS POUTRES

    Sur un navire, les poutres sont des poutres horizontales qui s'étendent sur le navire et soutiennent les ponts. Si vous êtes aux extrémités du faisceau, votre vaisseau penche à un angle dangereux. Autrement dit, vous êtes dans une situation précaire.

    LIGNE ABEILLE


    Autrefois, les gens croyaient que les abeilles volaient en ligne droite vers leur ruche. Donc, si vous avez fait une ligne d'abeille pour quelque chose, vous y êtes allé directement.

    DÉPASSER LES BORNES

    A l'origine, un pâle était une zone placée sous l'autorité d'un certain fonctionnaire. Aux XIVe et XVe siècles, le roi anglais régnait sur Dublin et ses environs connus sous le nom de Pale. Toute personne « hors du commun » était considérée comme sauvage et dangereuse.

    GRANDE PERRUQUE

    Au XVIIIe siècle, lorsque de nombreux hommes portaient des perruques, les hommes les plus importants portaient les plus grandes perruques. C’est pourquoi aujourd’hui les personnes importantes sont appelées grosses perruques.

    MORDRE LA BALLE

    Ce vieil dicton signifie sourire et supporter une situation douloureuse. Cela vient des jours précédant les anesthésies. Un soldat sur le point de subir une opération a reçu une balle à mordre.

    LE MORDANT ÊTRE MORDÉ

    Ce vieil adage n’a rien à voir avec les animaux. Au XVIIe siècle, un mordeur était un escroc. « Parler du mordeur qui se fait mordre » était à l'origine une phrase décrivant un escroc battu à son propre jeu.

    MORD LA POUSSIÈRE

    Cette phrase vient d'une traduction du poème épique de la Grèce antique, l'Iliade, sur la guerre entre les Grecs et les Troyens. C'était une façon poétique de décrire la mort d'un guerrier.

    FIN AMÈRE

    Le câble d'ancrage était enroulé autour de poteaux appelés bitts. Le dernier morceau de câble s’appelait la fin amère. Si vous laissiez le câble jusqu'au bout, vous ne pouviez rien faire d'autre, vous aviez atteint la fin de vos ressources.

    L'AVEUGLE GUIDE L'AVEUGLE

    Dans Matthieu 15 : 14, Jésus a critiqué les pharisiens, les autorités religieuses de son époque, en disant qu'« ils étaient des aveugles qui conduisaient des aveugles ».

    SANG BLEU

    Cela signifie aristocratique. Pendant des siècles, les Arabes ont occupé l’Espagne, mais ils en ont été progressivement chassés au Moyen Âge. La classe supérieure espagnole avait la peau plus pâle que la plupart de la population car leurs ancêtres ne s'étaient pas mariés avec des Arabes. Comme ils avaient la peau pâle, le sang « bleu » qui coulait dans leurs veines était plus visible. (Bien sûr, tout le sang est rouge, mais il paraît parfois bleu lorsqu'il coule dans les veines). Ainsi, le sang bleu est devenu synonyme de classe supérieure.

    BOBBIES, ÉPlucheurs

    Ces deux surnoms pour les policiers viennent de Sir Robert Peel qui fonda la première force de police moderne en 1829.

    POUR DÉMARRER

    Si vous obtenez quelque chose pour démarrer, cela signifie que vous l'obtenez en plus. Cependant, cela n’a rien à voir avec les bottes que vous portez aux pieds. Il s’agit d’une corruption du vieux mot bot, qui signifiait profit ou avantage.

    NÉ AVEC UNE CUILLÈRE D'ARGENT DANS LA BOUCHE

    Autrefois, lors du baptême d'un enfant, il était de tradition que les parrains et marraines offrent une cuillère en argent en cadeau (s'ils en avaient les moyens !). Pourtant, un enfant né dans une famille riche ne devait pas attendre. Il ou elle avait tout depuis le début. Ils sont « nés avec une cuillère en argent dans la bouche ».

    UN ROSEAU CASSÉ

    Cette phrase est tirée d'Isaïe 36 : 6. Lorsque les Assyriens assiégèrent Jérusalem, l'un d'eux se tenait hors des murs et demanda s'ils espéraient de l'aide de l'Égypte. Il a décrit l'Égypte comme un « roseau brisé ».

    C

    TYPE

    Ce mot est dérivé de l'ancien mot Chapman qui signifiait marchand ou commerçant. Il est à son tour dérivé de ceapman. Le vieux mot ceap signifiait vendre.

    Bloquer un bloc

    Lorsque les poulies ou les poulies d'un voilier étaient si serrées l'une contre l'autre qu'elles ne pouvaient plus être rapprochées, on disait qu'elles étaient calées en bloc.

    DES CHARBON À NEWCASTLE

    Avant l’invention du chemin de fer, les marchandises étaient souvent transportées par eau. Le charbon était transporté par bateau de Newcastle à Londres par voie maritime. On l'appelait charbon de mer. Amener du charbon à Newcastle était évidemment un exercice inutile.

    BITE UN CERCEAU

    Cette phrase vient d'un tapotement primitif appelé spile et shive. Un frisson était un woo un tube de tanière au fond d'un tonneau et un déversoir était un woo tanière bonde. Vous avez retiré le shive pour laisser le liquide s'écouler et l'avez remplacé pour arrêter l'écoulement. Le spile était parfois appelé coq. Si les gens étaient extrêmement heureux et voulaient faire la fête, ils retiraient le coq et le mettaient sur le cerceau sur le dessus du tonneau pour permettre à la boisson de s'écouler librement. C'était donc un cerceau. Alors cogner un cerceau signifiait extatique.

    CODSWALLOP

    Au XIXe siècle, wallop était un terme d'argot désignant la bière. Un homme nommé Codd a commencé à vendre de la limonade et elle s'appelait Codswallop. Avec le temps, codswallop a commencé à signifier tout ce qui était sans valeur ou inférieur et plus tard tout ce qui était faux.

    TERRE DU COUCOU DES NUAGES

    Cette phrase vient d'une pièce intitulée Les Oiseaux du dramaturge grec Aristophane (vers 448-385 av. J.-C.). Dans la pièce, les oiseaux décident de construire une ville utopique appelée Cloud Cuckoo City.

    CUIVRE

    Le vieux mot flic signifiait saisir ou capturer. Ainsi, au XIXe siècle, les policiers étaient appelés flics parce qu'ils attrapaient ou attrapaient les criminels.

    LARMES DE CROCODILE


    Il s’agit d’une démonstration peu sincère de chagrin ou de tristesse. Cela vient de la vieille croyance selon laquelle un crocodile pleurait (sans sincérité !) s’il tuait et mangeait un homme.

    FUIR

    En cas d'urgence, plutôt que de lever l'ancre, les marins coupaient le câble de l'ancre puis couraient avec le vent.

    D

    LE DIABLE À PAYER

    À l'origine, ce vieil adage disait « le diable doit payer et pas de discours brûlant ». Sur un voilier, un diable était la couture entre les planches. Celui-ci devait être rendu étanche. Les fibres des vieilles cordes étaient d'abord martelées dans la couture, puis de la poix (une substance semblable au goudron) était versée (ou payée) dessus. Si vous aviez le diable à payer et pas de discours brûlant, vous aviez des ennuis.

    QU'EST-CE QUE LES DICKENS!

    Ce vieux dicton ne vient pas de l’écrivain Charles Dickens (1812-1870). Il est bien plus vieux que lui ! Il existe depuis au moins le 16ème siècle. À l'origine, « Dickens » était un autre nom pour le diable.

    DIFFÉRENTES BOUILLOIRES DE POISSON

    Dans le passé, une bouilloire n’était pas nécessairement un appareil permettant de faire bouillir de l’eau pour préparer une tasse de thé. Une marmite pour faire bouillir des aliments (comme du poisson) était également appelée bouilloire. Malheureusement, personne ne sait vraiment pourquoi nous disons « une autre marmite de poisson ».

    NE REGARDEZ PAS UN CHEVAL CADEAU DANS LA BOUCHE

    Ce vieil dicton signifie qu’il ne faut pas examiner un cadeau de trop près ! On peut connaître l'âge d'un cheval en regardant ses dents, c'est pourquoi les gens « regardaient un cheval dans la bouche ».

    DOUTE DE THOMAS

    Cette phrase vient de Jean 20 : 24-27. Après sa résurrection, Jésus est apparu à ses disciples. Toutefois l’un d’eux, prénommé Thomas, était absent. Lorsque les autres lui dirent que Jésus était vivant, Thomas dit qu'il ne croirait pas tant qu'il n'aurait pas vu les marques sur les mains de Jésus et la blessure au côté causée par une lance romaine. Jésus réapparut et dit à Thomas : « Arrête de douter et crois ! »

    AU TALON

    Si les talons de vos chaussures étaient usés, vous aviez une apparence minable.

    COURAGE NÉERLANDAIS

    Au XVIIe siècle, l’Angleterre et la Hollande étaient rivales. Ils ont mené des guerres en 1652-54, 1665-67 et 1672-74. On disait (très injustement) que les Néerlandais devaient boire de l'alcool pour se donner du courage. D'autres expressions insultantes sont Dutch Treat (ce qui signifie que vous payez pour vous-même) et Double Dutch qui signifie charabia.

    TEINTÉ DANS LA LAINE

    La laine teinte avant d'être tissée gardait mieux sa couleur que woo J'ai teint après tissage de 'teint en pièce'.

    E

    RÉSERVÉ

    Cela vient de l’époque où les animaux avaient les oreilles marquées pour que leur propriétaire puisse être facilement identifié.

    MANGE BOIS ET SOIS HEUREUX

    Ce vieil dicton est tiré d'Ecclésiaste 8 :15 : « Il n'y a pas de meilleure chose sous le soleil que de manger, de boire et de se réjouir ».

    ÉCHAPPÉ PAR LA PEAU DE VOS DENTS

    Cette phrase vient de la Bible, de Job 19 :20.

    F

    RAPIDE ET LÂCHE

    Traditionnellement, si vous vouliez que les archers s'arrêtent et ne tirent pas de flèches, vous criiez « vite ! ». Les archers « lâchaient » également des flèches. Donc, si vous jouiez vite et librement, vous disiez une chose et en faisiez une autre.

    PIEDS D'ARGILE

    Si une personne que nous admirons a une faiblesse fatale, nous disons qu’elle a les pieds d’argile. Cette phrase vient de la Bible. Le roi Nabuchodonosor rêvait d'une statue. Il avait une tête en or, des bras et une poitrine en argent, un ventre et des cuisses en bronze et des jambes en fer. Cependant ses pieds étaient constitués d’un mélange de fer et d’argile. Un rocher a heurté les pieds de la statue et la statue entière a été brisée. Le prophète Daniel a interprété le rêve comme celui d’une série d’empires, qui finiraient tous par être détruits. (Daniel 2 : 27-44).

    VIOLEAU PENDANT QUE ROME BRÛLE

    Il existe une légende selon laquelle, lorsque Rome a brûlé en 64 après JC, l'empereur Néron jouait de la lyre (pas du violon !). Les historiens sont sceptiques quant à cette histoire.

    FEU DE PAILLE

    Les mousquets avaient un bac d'amorçage rempli de poudre à canon. Lorsque le silex heurtait l'acier, il enflammait la poudre dans la poêle, qui à son tour enflammait la charge principale de poudre à canon et tirait la balle de mousquet. Cependant, parfois, la poudre dans la poêle ne parvenait pas à allumer la charge principale. Dans ce cas, vous avez eu un feu de paille.

    VOLER DANS LA POMMADE

    Ce vieux dicton vient de la Bible. Dans Ecclésiaste 10 : 1, l'auteur dit que les mouches mortes donnent au parfum une mauvaise odeur (dans les anciennes versions de la Bible, le mot pour parfum est traduit par « pommade »).

    BRIO

    Si une flotte remportait une nette victoire, les navires rentraient au port avec leurs couleurs flottant fièrement sur leurs mâts.

    FREE-LANCE

    Au Moyen Âge, les indépendants étaient des soldats qui se battaient pour quiconque voulait les embaucher. C’étaient littéralement des free lances.

    DE LA BOUCHE DES CHEVAUX

    Vous pouvez connaître l’âge d’un cheval en examinant ses dents. Un marchand de chevaux peut vous mentir, mais vous pouvez toujours découvrir la vérité « par la bouche du cheval ».

    g

    SE FAIRE VIRER

    Cela vient de l'époque où les ouvriers transportaient leurs outils dans des sacs. Si votre employeur vous a licencié, il était temps de récupérer vos outils et de partir.

    DOREZ LE LYS

    Cette phrase est tirée du Roi Jean de William Shakespeare. "Dorer l'or raffiné, peindre le lys est un excès inutile et ridicule".

    DONNER À QUELQU'UN L'ÉPAULE FROIDE

    Lorsqu'un visiteur indésirable arrivait, vous lui donniez de l'épaule de mouton froide au lieu de de la viande chaude pour lui indiquer qu'il ne devait plus rappeler.

    FAIRE UN MILLE SUPPLÉMENTAIRE

    Selon la loi, un soldat romain pouvait forcer n'importe qui à transporter son équipement sur 1 mile. Dans Matthieu 5 :41, Jésus dit à ses disciples : « Si quelqu'un vous force à faire 1 mile, faites 2 miles avec lui ».

    SE DÉTÉRIORER

    Tout animal de ferme qui avait perdu son utilité, comme une poule qui ne pondait plus d'œufs, allait littéralement au pot. On le cuisinait et on le mangeait.

    Bon sang, mon Dieu

    Dans le passé, il n'était pas poli d'utiliser l'exclamation « Dieu ! » Au lieu de cela, les gens disaient Bon sang ! ou alors Mon Dieu ! Parfois, ils disaient « diable » au lieu de « enfer ».

    AU REVOIR

    C'est une contraction des mots Dieu soit avec vous (vous).

    H

    TOUR DE CHAPEAU

    Cela vient du cricket. Une fois, un quilleur qui a pris trois guichets lors de livraisons successives s'est vu offrir un nouveau chapeau par son club.

    CACHE VOTRE LUMIÈRE SOUS LE BOISSON

    Un boisseau était un récipient permettant de mesurer le grain. Dans Matthieu 15 : 15, Jésus dit : « On n'allume pas non plus une bougie pour la mettre sous le boisseau, mais on la place sur un chandelier ».

    LE CHOIX DES HOBSONS

    Cela signifie ne pas avoir le choix du tout. Au XVIe siècle et au début du XVIIe siècle, si vous partiez en voyage, vous pouviez louer un cheval pour vous emmener d'une ville à l'autre et voyager en relais de chevaux. (C'était mieux que d'épuiser son propre cheval lors d'un long voyage sur des routes en très mauvais état). Au début des années 1600, Thomas Hobson était un homme de Cambridge qui louait des chevaux. Cependant, il ne laissait pas les clients choisir le cheval qu'ils voulaient monter. Au lieu de cela, ils devaient monter le cheval le plus proche de l'entrée de l'écurie. Donc, si vous lui louiez un cheval, vous aviez le « choix de Hobson ».

    LEVAGE PAR VOTRE PROPRE PETARD

    Un pétard était une sorte de bombe Tudor. Il s'agissait d'un récipient de poudre à canon muni d'une mèche, placé contre un woo porte de tanière. Parfois, tout ne se passait pas comme prévu et le pétard explosait prématurément, vous projetant dans les airs. Vous avez été hissé par votre propre pétard.

    PLUS SAINT QUE TOI

    Cela vient de la Bible, Isaïe 65 :5, le prophète de l'Ancien Testament réprimande les gens qui disent « reste seul, ne t'approche pas de moi car je suis plus saint que toi ».

    VOYAGE DE NOCES

    Ceci est dérivé du mois du miel. C'était une vieille tradition selon laquelle les jeunes mariés buvaient de l'hydromel (à base de miel) pendant un mois après le mariage.

    COÛTE QUE COÛTE

    Ce vieux dicton vient probablement d'une loi médiévale qui stipulait que les paysans pouvaient utiliser des branches d'arbres pour faire du feu. woo d s'ils pouvaient les atteindre avec leur houlette de berger ou leur serpe.

    Humble tarte

    L’expression manger une humble tarte était autrefois manger une humble tarte. Les umbles étaient les intestins ou les parties les moins appétissantes d'un animal et les serviteurs et autres personnes de la classe inférieure les mangeaient. Ainsi, si un cerf était tué, les riches mangeaient du gibier et ceux de faible statut mangeaient une humble tarte. Avec le temps, manger une humble tarte s’est corrompu et en est venu à signifier s’avilir ou agir avec humilité.

    K

    CASSER SA PIPE

    Lorsque vous abattez un cochon, vous attachez ses pattes arrière à un woo den poutre (en français buquet). En mourant, l'animal a donné un coup de pied dans le buquet.

    CONNAÎTRE LES FICELLES

    Sur un voilier, il était essentiel de connaître les ficelles du métier.

    CÉDER

    Autrefois, une articulation signifiait n'importe quelle articulation, y compris le genou. Se mettre à genoux signifiait s'agenouiller en signe de soumission.

    L

    AGNEAU À L'ABATTOIR

    Ceci est tiré d'Ésaïe 53 : 7 : « Il est amené comme un agneau à l'abattoir ». Plus tard, ce verset fut appliqué à Jésus.

    REPOSEZ-VOUS SUR VOS LAURIERS, REGARDEZ VOS LAURIERS

    Dans le monde antique, les athlètes vainqueurs, d’autres héros et personnalités distinguées recevaient des couronnes de feuilles de laurier. Si vous vous reposez sur vos lauriers, vous comptez sur vos réalisations passées. Si vous devez vous tourner vers vos lauriers, cela signifie que vous avez de la concurrence.

    UN LÉOPARD NE PEUT PAS CHANGER SES TACHES

    C'est un autre vieux dicton de la Bible. Celui-ci vient de Jérémie 13 :23 « Un Éthiopien peut-il changer de peau ou un léopard ses taches ? ».

    LAISSE LE CHAT EN DEHORS DU SAC

    Ce vieux dicton vient probablement de l’époque où les gens qui vendaient des porcelets dans des sacs mettaient parfois un chat dans le sac à la place. Si vous laissez le chat sortir du sac, vous exposez le truc.

    LÉCHER EN FORME

    Au Moyen Âge, les gens pensaient que les oursons naissaient sans forme et que leur mère les léchait littéralement pour leur donner forme.

    LILY A VIVÉ

    Signifie lâche. Les gens croyaient autrefois que vos passions venaient de votre foie. Si vous aviez le foie de lys, votre foie était blanc (car il ne contenait pas de sang). Donc tu étais un lâche.

    UN PETIT OISEAU M'A DIT

    Ce vieux dicton vient de la Bible. Dans Ecclésiaste 10 : 20, l'auteur nous avertit de ne pas maudire le roi ou les riches, même en privé, car un « oiseau du ciel » pourrait rapporter ce que vous dites.

    UN LONG PLAN

    Une stratégie à long terme est une option qui n’a que peu de chances de succès. Autrefois, les armes n'étaient précises qu'à courte portée. Ainsi, un « tir de longue distance » (tiré sur une longue distance) n'avait qu'une faible chance d'atteindre sa cible.

    VIEUX

    Lorsqu'un cheval vieillit, ses gencives reculent et si vous examinez sa bouche, elle paraît « longue dans la dent ».

  • Original Anglais Traduction Français

    M

    MAD AS A HATTER

    Some people say the phrase comes from the fact that in the 18th and 19th centuries hat makers used mercury nitrate in their work. Exposure to this chemical does indeed send you mad. However according to some people the origin of this phrase is much older. Hatter is a corruption of the Saxon word 'atter', which meant adder or viper. Furthermore 'mad' originally meant poisonous. So if you were mad as an atter you were as 'poisonous' (bad tempered or aggressive) as an atter (adder). It goes to show that often it is impossible to be certain where old sayings come from.

    MAUDLIN

    This is a corruption of Magdalene. Mary Magdalene was a prostitute who became a follower of Jesus. In paintings she was often shown weeping tears of repentance. So she became associated with sentimentality.

    MOOT POINT

    This comes from the Saxon word moot or mote, which meant a meeting to discuss things. A moot point was one that needed to be discussed or debated.

    MONEY FOR OLD ROPE

    Rope made from hemp had a limited lifetime. When it wore out it was picked apart and recycled. It was used for caulking. Rope fibres (known as oakum) were hammered into the seams between planks of a ship and hot pitch was poured over it. This was done to waterproof the ship. Of course you got money for the old rope. The phrase came to mean money for anything (seemingly) worthless.

    N

    NAIL YOUR COLOURS TO THE MAST

    In battle a ship surrendered by lowering its flag. If you nailed your colours to the mast you had no intention of surrendering. You were totally loyal to your side.

    NAMBY-PAMBY

    This was originally a nickname for the poet Ambrose Philips (1674-1749) who was known for writing sentimental verse.

    NICKNAME

    This is a corruption of eke name. The old word eke meant alternative.

    NO REST FOR THE WICKED

    This phrase comes from the Bible. In Isaiah 57:21 the prophet says: 'there is no peace saith my God to the wicked'.

    NOT ENOUGH ROOM TO SWING A CAT

    This comes from the use of a kind of whip called a cat o' nine tails.

    O

    ON TENTERHOOKS

    After it was woven wool was pounded in a mixture of clay and water to clean and thicken it. This was called fulling. Afterwards the wool was stretched on a frame called a tenter to dry. It was hung on tenterhooks. So if you were very tense, like stretched cloth, you were on tenterhooks.

    P

    PANDEMONIUM

    This cmes from John Milton’s poem Paradise Lost. In Hell the chief city is Pandemonium. In Greek Pandemonium means 'all the devils'.

    PASTURES NEW

    In 1637 John Milton wrote a poem called Lycidas, which includes the words 'Tomorrow to fresh woods and pastures new'.

    PAY ON THE NAIL

    In the Middle Ages 'nails' were flat-topped columns in markets. When a buyer and a seller agreed a deal money was placed on the nail for all to see.

    PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

    In Matthew 7:6 Jesus warned his followers not to give what is sacred to dogs and not to throw pearls (of wisdom) before swine (the ungodly).

    PEEPING TOM

    According to legend a man named Leofric taxed the people of Coventry heavily. His wife, lady Godiva, begged him not to. Leofric said he would end the tax if she rode through the streets of Coventry naked. So she did. Peeping Tom is a much later addition to the story. Everybody in Coventry was supposed to stay indoors with his or her shutters closed. However peeping Tom had a sneaky look at Godiva and was struck blind.

    PEPPERCORN RENT

    In the Middle Ages and Tudor Times rents were sometimes paid in peppercorns because pepper was so expensive. Peppercorns were actually used as a form of currency. They were given as bribes or as part of a bride's dowry.

    A PIG IN A POKE

    This is something bought without checking it first. A poke was a bag. If you bought a pig in a poke it might turn out the 'pig' was actually a puppy or a cat. (See Sold A Pup).

    PIN MONEY

    In Tudor times and before when a merchant or tradesman made a bargain it was the custom for him to give some money for the other man's wife or daughter 'for pins'. (Tudor women needed lots of pins to hold their clothes together).

    POT LUCK

    In the past all kinds of food went into a big pot for cooking. If you sat down to a meal with a family you often had to take 'pot luck' and could never be quite sure what you would be served.

    THE POWERS THAT BE

    This comes from Romans 13:1 when Paul says 'the powers that be are ordained of God'.

    PRIDE GOES BEFORE A FALL

    This old saying comes from the Bible, from Proverbs 16:18 'Pride goes before destruction and a haughty spirit before a fall'.

    PULL THE WOOL OVER MY EYES

    In the 18th century it was the fashion to wear white, curly wigs. they were nick named wool possibly because they resembled a sheep's fleece.

    R

    RACK AND RUIN

    Rack has nothing to do with the torture instrument. It is a modification of 'wrack' which was an alternative way of saying 'wreck'.

    READ THE RIOT ACT

    Following a law of 1715 if a rowdy group of 12 or more people gathered, a magistrate would read an official statement ordering them to disperse. Anyone who did not, after one hour, could be arrested and punished.

    RED HERRING

    Poachers and other unsavoury characters would drag a herring across the ground where they had just walked to throw dogs off their scent. (Herrings were made red by the process of curing).

    RED TAPE

    This phrase comes from the days when official documents were bound with red tape.

    RED LETTER DAYS

    In the Middle Ages saints days were marked in red in calendars. People did not work on some saint’s days or holy days. Our word holiday is derived from holy day.

    RING TRUE, RING OF TRUTH

    In the past coins were actually made of gold, silver or other metals. Their value depended on the amount of gold or silver they contained. Some people would make counterfeit coins by mixing gold or silver with a cheaper metal. However you could check if a coin was genuine by dropping it. If it was made of the proper metal it would 'ring true' of have the 'ring of truth'.

    RUB SALT INTO A WOUND

    This is derived from the days when salt was rubbed into wounds as an antiseptic.

    RULE OF THUMB

    This comes from the days when brewers estimated the temperature of a brew by dipping their thumb in it.

    S

    SALT OF THE EARTH

    Is another Biblical phrase. It comes from Matthew 5:13 when Jesus told his followers 'You are the salt of the Earth'.

    SCAPEGOAT

    In the Old Testament (Leviticus 16: 7-10) two goats were selected. One was sacrificed. The other was spared but the High Priest laid his hands on it and confessed the sins of his people. The goat was then driven into the wilderness. He was a symbolic 'scapegoat' for the people's sins.

    SCOT FREE

    This has nothing to do with Scotland. Scot is an old word for payment so if you went scot free you went without paying.

    TO SEE A MAN ABOUT A DOG

    This old saying first appeared in 1866 in a play by Dion Boucicault (1820-1890) called the Flying Scud in which a character makes the excuse that he is going 'to see a man about a dog' to get away.

    SENT TO COVENTRY

    The most likely explanation for this old saying is that during the English Civil War Royalists captured in the Midlands were sent to Coventry. They were held prisoner in St Johns Church and the local people shunned them and refused to speak to them.

    SET YOUR TEETH ON EDGE

    This is from Jeremiah 31:30 'Every man that eateth the sour grape, his teeth shall be set on edge'.

    SHAMBLES

    Originally a shamble was a bench. Butchers used to set up benches to sell meat from. In time the street where meat was sold often became known as the Shambles. (This street name survives in many towns today). However because butchers used to throw offal into the street shambles came to mean a mess or something very untidy or disorganised.

    SHIBBOLETH

    This is a word used by members of a particular group. It identifies people as members of the group. It comes from the Old Testament Judges 12: 5-7. Two groups of Hebrews, the Gileadites and the Ephraimites fought each other. The Gileadites captured the fords over the River Jordan leading to Ephraim. If a man wanted to cross a ford they made him say 'Shibboleth' (a Hebrew word meaning ear of grain). The Ephraimites could not pronounce the word properly and said 'Sibboleth'. If anyone mispronounced the word the Gileadites knew he was an enemy and killed him.

    SHORT SHRIFT

    A shrift was a confession made to a priest. Criminals were allowed to make a short shrift before they were executed. so if you gave somebody short shrift you gave them a few minutes to confess their sins before carrying out the execution.

    SHOW A LEG

    This comes from the days when women were allowed onboard ships. When it was time for sailors to get out of their hammocks women would show a leg to prove they were females not members of the crew.

    SHOW YOUR TRUE COLOURS

    Pirate ships would approach their intended victim showing a false flag to lure them into a false sense of security. When it was too late for the victim to escape they would show their true colours-the jolly roger!

    SLING YOUR HOOK

    In the days of wooden sailing ships 'hook' was slang for an anchor. If you slung your hook you weighed your anchor and suspended it by ropes from the side of the hull. So sling your hook meant weigh your anchor and go.

    SOLD A PUP

    If you bought a piglet the seller placed it in a bag or sack. Sometimes, with his hands out of sight, the seller would slip a puppy into the sack. If you were swindled in that way you were sold a pup.

    SPINNING A YARN

    Rope was made in ports everywhere. The rope makers chatted while they worked. They told each other stories while they were spinning a yarn.

    SPICK AND SPAN

    Today this means neat and tidy but originally the saying was spick and span new. A span was a wood shaving. If something was newly built it would have tell-tale wood chips so it was 'span new' spick is an old word for a nail. New spicks or nails would be shiny. However words and phrases often change their meanings over centuries and spick and span came to mean neat and tidy.

    SPINSTER

    A Spinster is an unmarried woman. Originally a spinster was simply a woman who made her living by spinning wool on a spinning wheel. However it was so common for single women to support themselves that way that by the 18th century 'spinster' was a synonym for a middle-aged unmarried woman.

    SPOIL THE SHIP FOR A HA'PENNY WORTH OF TAR

    Originally 'ship' was sheep and the saying comes from the practice of covering cuts on sheep with tar.

    START FROM SCRATCH

    This phrase comes from the days when a line was scratched in the ground for a race. The racers would start from the scratch.

    STRAIGHT LACED

    This phrase was originally STRAIT laces. The old English word strait meant tight or narrow. In Tudor times buttons were mostly for decoration. Laces were used to hold clothes together. If a woman was STRAIT laced she was prim and proper.

    THE STRAIGHT AND NARROW

    This comes from Matthew 7:14. In the King James version of the Bible, published in 1611, he says: 'Strait is the gate and narrow is the way which leadeth to life'. The old English word strait meant tight or narrow but when it went out of use the phrase changed to 'STRAIGHT and narrow'.

    SWAN SONG

    This comes from an old belief that swans, who are usually silent, burst into beautiful song when they are dying.

    SWASHBUCKLER

    A buckle was a kind of small shield. When men wanted to impress people they would stride around town with a sword and buckler on their belts. The buckler would 'swash' against their clothes. So they became known as swashbucklers.

    SWINGING THE LEAD

    On board ships a lead weight was attached to a long rope. A knot was tied every six feet in the rope. The lead weight was swung then thrown overboard. When it sank to the seabed you counted the number of knots that disappeared and this told you how deep the sea was. Some sailors felt it was an easy job and 'swinging the lead' came to mean avoiding hard work. In time it came to mean feigning illness to avoid work.

    T

    TAKE SOMEBODY UNDER YOUR WING

    In Luke 12:34 Jesus laments that he wished to gather the people of Jerusalem as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings but Jerusalem was not willing.

    TAKEN ABACK

    If the wind suddenly changed direction a sailing ship stopped moving forward. It was 'taken aback', which was a bit of a shock for the sailors.

    TAWDRY

    This is a corruption of St Audrey because cheap jewellery was sold at St Audrey's fair in Ely, Cambridgeshire.

    THORN IN MY SIDE

    This comes from the Bible. In 2 Corinthians 12:7 Paul states that he was given a 'thorn in my flesh' to prevent him becoming proud. We are not told what the 'thorn' was, perhaps it was some form of illness.

    THROW DOWN THE GAUNTLET

    In the Middle Ages a gauntlet was the glove in a suit of armour. Throwing down your gauntlet was a way of challenging somebody to a duel.

    TONGUE IN CHEEK

    In the 18th century sticking your tongue in your cheek was a sign of contempt. It is not clear how speaking with your tongue in your cheek took on its modern meaning.

    TOUCH AND GO

    This old saying probably comes from ships sailing in shallow waters where they might touch the seabed then go. If so, they were obviously in a dangerous and uncertain situation.

    TOUCH WOOD

    In Celtic time’s people believed that benevolent spirits lived in trees. When in trouble people knocked on the tree and asked the spirits for help.

    HAVE NO TRUCK WITH

    Truck originally meant barter and is derived from a French word 'troquer'. Originally if you had no truck with somebody you refused to trade with him or her. It came to mean you refused to have anything to do with them.

    TRUE BLUE

    This phrase was originally true as Coventry blue as the dyers in Coventry used a blue dye that lasted and did not wash out easily. However the phrase became shortened.

    TURN THE OTHER CHEEK

    Jesus told his followers not to retaliate against violence. In Luke 6:29 he told them that if somebody strikes you on one cheek turn the other cheek to him as well.

    TURN OVER A NEW LEAF

    This means to make a fresh start. It mean a leaf of page of a book.

    TURNED THE CORNER

    Ships that had sailed past the Cape of Good Hope or Cape Horn were said to have 'turned the corner'.

    U

    UP THE POLE

    The pole was a mast of a ship. Climbing it was dangerous and, not surprisingly, you had to be a bit crazy to go up there willingly. So if you were a bit mad you were up the pole.

    W

    WARTS AND ALL

    When Oliver Cromwell 1599-1658 had his portrait painted he ordered the artist not to flatter him. He insisted on being painted 'warts and all'.

    WASH MY HANDS OF

    The Roman governor, Pontius Pilate, refused to be involved in the death of an innocent person (Jesus). So he washed his hands in front of the crowd, symbolically disassociating himself from the execution.

    WEAR YOUR HEART ON YOUR SLEEVE

    In the Middle Ages knights who fought at tournaments wore a token of their lady on their sleeves. Today if you make your feelings obvious to everybody you wear your heart on your sleeve.

    WEASEL WORDS

    This phrase is said to come from an old belief that weasels could suck out the inside of an egg leaving its shell intact.

    WEIGH ANCHOR

    The 'weigh' is a corruption of the old word wegan which meant carry or lift.

    WENT WEST

    Once criminals were hanged at Tyburn - west of London. So if you went west you went to be hanged.

    WIDE BERTH

    A berth is the place where a ship is tied up or anchored. When the anchor was lowered a ship would tend to move about on the anchor cable so it was important to give it a wide berth to avoid collisions. Today to give someone wide berth is to steer clear of them.

    WILLY-NILLY

    This phrase is believed to be derived from the old words will-ye, nill-ye (or will-he, nill- he) meaning whether you want to or not (or whether he wants to or not).

    WIN HANDS DOWN

    This old saying comes from horse racing. If a jockey was a long way ahead of his competitors and sure to win the race he could relax and put his hands down at his sides.

    WHEAT FROM THE CHAFF

    In the ancient world grain was hurled into the air using a tool called a winnowing fork. Wind separated the edible part of the grain (wheat) from the lighter, inedible part (chaff). In Matthew 3:12 John the Baptist warned that on the judgement day Jesus would separate the wheat from the chaff (good people from evil).

    WHIPPING BOY

    Prince Edward, later Edward VI, had a boy who was whipped in his place every time he was naughty.

    WHITE ELEPHANT

    In Siam (modern day Thailand) white or pale elephants were very valuable. The king sometimes gave white elephant to a person he disliked. It might seem a wonderful gift but it was actually a punishment because it cost so much to keep!

    A WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING

    In Matthew 7:15 Jesus warned his followers of false prophets saying they were like 'wolves in sheep's clothing' outwardly disarming

    M.

    FOU COMME UN CHAPELIER

    Certains disent que cette expression vient du fait qu’aux XVIIIe et XIXe siècles, les chapeliers utilisaient du nitrate de mercure dans leur travail. L’exposition à ce produit chimique vous rend en effet fou. Cependant, selon certaines personnes, l'origine de cette expression est beaucoup plus ancienne. Hatter est une corruption du mot saxon « atter », qui signifie vipère ou vipère. De plus, « fou » signifiait à l’origine venimeux. Donc, si vous étiez fou comme un atter, vous étiez aussi « venimeux » (de mauvaise humeur ou agressif) qu'un atter (additionneur). Cela montre qu’il est souvent impossible de savoir avec certitude d’où viennent les vieux dictons.

    LARMOYANT

    C'est une corruption de Madeleine. Marie-Madeleine était une prostituée devenue disciple de Jésus. Dans les peintures, elle était souvent montrée en train de pleurer des larmes de repentance. Elle est donc devenue associée à la sentimentalité.

    POINT DISCUTABLE

    Cela vient du mot saxon moot ou mote, qui signifiait une réunion pour discuter de choses. Un point discutable était un point qui devait être discuté ou débattu.

    DE L'ARGENT POUR UNE VIEILLE CORDE

    Les cordes en chanvre avaient une durée de vie limitée. Lorsqu’il était usé, il était démonté et recyclé. Il servait au calfeutrage. Des fibres de corde (connues sous le nom d'étoupe) étaient martelées dans les coutures entre les planches d'un navire et de la poix chaude était versée dessus. Cela a été fait pour imperméabiliser le navire. Bien sûr, tu as eu de l'argent pour la vieille corde. L’expression en est venue à signifier de l’argent pour tout ce qui (apparemment) ne vaut rien.

    N

    CLOUEZ VOS COULEURS AU MAT

    Au combat, un navire se rendait en abaissant son pavillon. Si vous clouiez vos couleurs au mât, vous n’aviez pas l’intention de vous rendre. Vous étiez totalement fidèle à vos côtés.

    NAMBY-PAMBY

    C'était à l'origine un surnom du poète Ambrose Philips (1674-1749), connu pour ses vers sentimentaux.

    SURNOM

    Il s'agit d'une corruption du nom eke. Le vieux mot eke signifiait alternative.

    PAS DE REPOS POUR LES MÉCHANTS

    Cette phrase vient de la Bible. Dans Isaïe 57 :21, le prophète dit : « il n'y a pas de paix, dit mon Dieu aux méchants ».

    PAS ASSEZ DE PLACE POUR BALANCER UN CHAT

    Cela vient de l'utilisation d'une sorte de fouet appelé chat à neuf queues.

    Ô

    SUR DES CHARBONS ARDENTS

    Après avoir été tissé woo J'ai été pilé dans un mélange d'argile et d'eau pour le nettoyer et l'épaissir. C'est ce qu'on appelait le foulage. Ensuite le woo J'étais étendu sur un cadre appelé tenture pour sécher. Il était suspendu à des haleines. Donc, si vous étiez très tendu, comme un tissu tendu, vous étiez en haleine.

    P.

    CHAOS

    Cela vient du poème Paradise Lost de John Milton. En Enfer, la ville principale est Pandémonium. En grec, Pandémonium signifie « tous les diables ».

    NOUVEAUX PÂTURAGES

    En 1637, John Milton écrivit un poème intitulé Lycidas, qui comprend les mots « Demain au frais ». woo ds et pâturages nouveaux'.

    PAYER SUR L'ONGLE

    Au Moyen Âge, les « clous » étaient des colonnes plates sur les marchés. Lorsqu’un acheteur et un vendeur s’accordaient sur une transaction, l’argent était placé sur le clou à la vue de tous.

    LES PERLES AVANT LES PORCS

    Dans Matthieu 7 : 6, Jésus a averti ses disciples de ne pas donner ce qui est sacré aux chiens et de ne pas jeter les perles (de sagesse) devant les porcs (les impies).

    VOYEUR

    Selon la légende, un homme nommé Leofric imposait lourdement les habitants de Coventry. Son épouse, Lady Godiva, le supplia de ne pas le faire. Leofric a déclaré qu'il mettrait fin à la taxe si elle parcourait nue les rues de Coventry. C’est ce qu’elle a fait. Peeping Tom est un ajout beaucoup plus tardif à l'histoire. Tout le monde à Coventry était censé rester à l’intérieur avec ses volets fermés. Cependant, le voyeur a jeté un regard sournois sur Godiva et a été frappé de cécité.

    LOCATION DE POIVRE

    Au Moyen Âge et à l'époque Tudor, les loyers étaient parfois payés en grains de poivre parce que le poivre était très cher. Les grains de poivre étaient en fait utilisés comme monnaie. Ils étaient offerts sous forme de pots-de-vin ou dans le cadre de la dot de la mariée.

    UN CHAT DANS UN SAC

    C'est quelque chose que j'ai acheté sans le vérifier au préalable. Un coup était un sac. Si vous avez acheté un cochon dans un sac, il se peut que le « cochon » soit en fait un chiot ou un chat. (Voir Vendu un chiot).

    PETITE MONNAIE

    À l'époque Tudor et avant, lorsqu'un marchand ou un commerçant concluait une affaire, il avait l'habitude de donner de l'argent à la femme ou à la fille de l'autre homme « contre des épingles ». (Les femmes Tudor avaient besoin de beaucoup d’épingles pour maintenir leurs vêtements ensemble).

    CHANCE DU POT

    Autrefois, toutes sortes d’aliments étaient cuits dans une grande marmite. Si vous vous asseyiez pour un repas en famille, vous deviez souvent tenter votre chance et ne pouviez jamais être sûr de ce qui vous serait servi.

    LES POUVOIRS EN PLACE

    Cela vient de Romains 13 : 1 lorsque Paul dit « les puissances en place sont ordonnées de Dieu ».

    LA FIERTÉ VA AVANT UNE CHUTE

    Ce vieux dicton vient de la Bible, de Proverbes 16 :18 : « L'orgueil précède la destruction et l'esprit hautain précède la chute ».

    TIRE LA LAINE SUR MES YEUX

    Au XVIIIe siècle, il était de mode de porter des perruques blanches et bouclées. ils étaient surnommés woo Peut-être parce qu'ils ressemblaient à la toison d'un mouton.

    R.

    RACK ET RUINE

    Rack n'a rien à voir avec l'instrument de torture. Il s'agit d'une modification de « wrack » qui était une manière alternative de dire « épave ».

    LIRE LA LOI ANTI-ÉMEUTE

    Conformément à une loi de 1715, si un groupe tapageur de 12 personnes ou plus se rassemblait, un magistrat lisait un communiqué officiel leur ordonnant de se disperser. Quiconque ne le ferait pas, après une heure, pourrait être arrêté et puni.

    HARENG ROUGE

    Les braconniers et autres personnages peu recommandables traînaient un hareng sur le sol où ils venaient de marcher pour dérouter les chiens. (Les harengs étaient rendus rouges par le processus de salaison).

    RUBAN ROUGE

    Cette phrase vient de l’époque où les documents officiels étaient reliés par des formalités administratives.

    JOURS DES LETTRES ROUGES

    Au Moyen Âge, les jours saints étaient marqués en rouge sur les calendriers. Les gens ne travaillaient pas certains jours saints ou jours saints. Notre mot fête est dérivé du jour saint.

    SONNERIE VRAIE, ANNEAU DE VÉRITÉ

    Dans le passé, les pièces de monnaie étaient en fait en or, en argent ou en d’autres métaux. Leur valeur dépendait de la quantité d’or ou d’argent qu’ils contenaient. Certaines personnes fabriquaient des pièces contrefaites en mélangeant de l’or ou de l’argent avec un métal moins cher. Cependant, vous pouvez vérifier si une pièce est authentique en la laissant tomber. S'il était fait du métal approprié, il « sonnerait vrai » ou aurait « l'anneau de la vérité ».

    FROTTEZ DU SEL DANS UNE PLAIE

    Cela vient de l’époque où le sel était appliqué sur les plaies comme antiseptique.

    Règle empirique

    Cela vient de l’époque où les brasseurs estimaient la température d’un breuvage en y plongeant leur pouce.

    S

    SEL DE LA TERRE

    Est une autre expression biblique. Cela vient de Matthieu 5 : 13 lorsque Jésus dit à ses disciples : « Vous êtes le sel de la terre ».

    BOUC ÉMISSAIRE

    Dans l’Ancien Testament (Lévitique 16 : 7-10), deux boucs étaient sélectionnés. Un a été sacrifié. L'autre fut épargné mais le Grand Prêtre lui imposa les mains et confessa les péchés de son peuple. La chèvre fut ensuite conduite dans le désert. Il était un « bouc émissaire » symbolique pour les péchés du peuple.

    SANS ÉCOSSE

    Cela n'a rien à voir avec l'Écosse. Scot est un vieux mot pour le paiement, donc si vous êtes allé sans frais, vous êtes allé sans payer.

    VOIR UN HOMME À PROPOS D'UN CHIEN

    Ce vieux dicton apparaît pour la première fois en 1866 dans une pièce de Dion Boucicault (1820-1890) intitulée Le Scud volant dans laquelle un personnage prétexte qu'il va « voir un homme à propos d'un chien » pour s'enfuir.

    ENVOYÉ À COVENTRY

    L'explication la plus probable de ce vieil dicton est que pendant la guerre civile anglaise, les royalistes capturés dans les Midlands ont été envoyés à Coventry. Ils ont été détenus dans l'église St Johns et la population locale les a évités et a refusé de leur parler.

    METTRE VOS DENTS SUR LE BORD

    Ceci est tiré de Jérémie 31 : 30 : « Tout homme qui mange du raisin aigre aura les dents agacées ».

    PAGAILLE

    A l'origine, une pagaille était un banc. Les bouchers installaient des bancs pour vendre la viande. Avec le temps, la rue où la viande était vendue est souvent connue sous le nom de Shambles. (Ce nom de rue survit aujourd'hui dans de nombreuses villes). Cependant, comme les bouchers jetaient les abats dans la rue, la pagaille signifiait un désordre ou quelque chose de très désordonné ou de désorganisé.

    SCHIBBOLETH

    C'est un mot utilisé par les membres d'un groupe particulier. Il identifie les personnes comme membres du groupe. Cela vient de l’Ancien Testament Juges 12 : 5-7. Deux groupes d'Hébreux, les Galaadites et les Éphraïmites, se sont affrontés. Les Galaadites prirent les gués du Jourdain menant à Éphraïm. Si un homme voulait traverser un gué, on lui faisait dire « Shibboleth » (un mot hébreu signifiant épi de grain). Les Éphraïmites ne parvenaient pas à prononcer le mot correctement et disaient « Sibboleth ». Si quelqu’un prononçait mal le mot, les Galaadites savaient qu’il était un ennemi et le tuaient.

    COURT DÉPART

    Un shrift était une confession faite à un prêtre. Les criminels étaient autorisés à faire un petit geste avant d'être exécutés. Ainsi, si vous négligez quelqu'un, vous lui donnez quelques minutes pour confesser ses péchés avant de procéder à l'exécution.

    MONTRER UNE JAMBE

    Cela vient de l’époque où les femmes étaient autorisées à bord des navires. Quand il était temps pour les marins de sortir de leur hamac, les femmes montraient une jambe pour prouver qu'elles étaient des femmes et qu'elles ne faisaient pas partie de l'équipage.

    MONTREZ VOS VRAIES COULEURS

    Les navires pirates s'approchaient de leur victime prévue en arborant un faux pavillon pour l'attirer dans un faux sentiment de sécurité. Lorsqu'il était trop tard pour que la victime puisse s'échapper, elle montrait son vrai visage : le Jolly Roger !

    LANCER VOTRE CROCHET

    Aux jours de woo Le «crochet» des voiliers était un argot désignant une ancre. Si vous jetiez votre hameçon, vous leviez votre ancre et la suspendiez par des cordes sur le côté de la coque. Alors lancer votre hameçon signifiait peser votre ancre et partir.

    VENDU UN CHIOT

    Si vous avez acheté un porcelet, le vendeur l'a placé dans un sac ou un sachet. Parfois, les mains hors de vue, le vendeur glissait un chiot dans le sac. Si vous étiez escroqué de cette façon, on vous vendait un chiot.

    FILER UN FIL

    La corde était fabriquée partout dans les ports. Les cordiers discutaient pendant qu'ils travaillaient. Ils se racontaient des histoires tout en filant une histoire.

    PICK ET SPAN

    Aujourd'hui, cela signifie propre et bien rangé, mais à l'origine, le dicton était nouveau et impeccable. Une travée était un woo d rasage. Si quelque chose avait été nouvellement construit, cela aurait été révélateur woo d chips donc c'était « span new » spick est un vieux mot pour un ongle. Les nouveaux clous ou pointes seraient brillants. Cependant, les mots et les expressions changent souvent de sens au fil des siècles et « impeccable » en est venu à signifier propre et bien rangé.

    VIEILLE FILLE

    Une célibataire est une femme célibataire. A l'origine, une célibataire était simplement une femme qui gagnait sa vie en filant. woo Je suis sur un rouet. Cependant, il était si courant que les femmes célibataires subviennent à leurs besoins de cette façon qu'au XVIIIe siècle, « vieille fille » était synonyme de femme célibataire d'âge moyen.

    GÂTEZ LE NAVIRE POUR UN HA'PENNY D'UNE VALEUR DE TAR

    À l'origine, « navire » signifiait mouton et le dicton vient de la pratique consistant à recouvrir les coupures des moutons avec du goudron.

    COMMENCER À PARTIR DE ZÉRO

    Cette phrase vient de l’époque où une ligne était tracée dans le sol pour une course. Les coureurs repartiraient de zéro.

    LACÉ DROIT

    Cette phrase était à l'origine des lacets STRAIT. Le vieux mot anglais strait signifiait serré ou étroit. À l’époque Tudor, les boutons étaient principalement destinés à la décoration. Les lacets étaient utilisés pour maintenir les vêtements ensemble. Si une femme avait des lacets STRAIT, elle était impeccable et convenable.

    LE DROIT ET L'ÉTROIT

    Cela vient de Matthieu 7 :14. Dans la version King James de la Bible, publiée en 1611, il dit : « La porte est étroite et le chemin étroit est celui qui mène à la vie ». Le vieux mot anglais strait signifiait serré ou étroit, mais lorsqu'il est devenu obsolète, l'expression a été remplacée par « DROIT et étroit ».

    CHANT DU CYGNE

    Cela vient d'une vieille croyance selon laquelle les cygnes, qui sont généralement silencieux, éclatent en chantant de belles chansons lorsqu'ils meurent.

    FIER-À-BRAS

    Une boucle était une sorte de petit bouclier. Lorsque les hommes voulaient impressionner les gens, ils se promenaient en ville avec une épée et un bouclier à la ceinture. Le bouclier « frappait » leurs vêtements. C’est ainsi qu’ils sont devenus connus sous le nom de bretteurs.

    Balancer la tête

    À bord des navires, un poids en plomb était attaché à une longue corde. Un nœud était fait tous les six pieds dans la corde. Le poids en plomb a été balancé puis jeté par-dessus bord. Lorsqu'il coulait au fond de la mer, vous comptiez le nombre de nœuds qui disparaissaient et cela vous indiquait la profondeur de la mer. Certains marins pensaient que c'était une tâche facile et « prendre la tête » signifiait éviter de travailler dur. Avec le temps, cela a fini par impliquer de feindre la maladie pour éviter de travailler.

    T

    PRENEZ QUELQU'UN SOUS VOTRE AILE

    Dans Luc 12 : 34, Jésus déplore qu’il ait voulu rassembler les habitants de Jérusalem comme une poule rassemble ses poussins sous ses ailes, mais Jérusalem ne l’a pas voulu.

    DÉCONTENANCÉ

    Si le vent changeait soudainement de direction, le voilier s'arrêtait d'avancer. Il a été « surpris », ce qui a été un peu un choc pour les marins.

    CLINQUANT

    Il s'agit d'une corruption de St Audrey car des bijoux bon marché étaient vendus à la foire de St Audrey à Ely, dans le Cambridgeshire.

    ÉPINE DANS MON CÔTÉ

    Cela vient de la Bible. Dans 2 Corinthiens 12 : 7, Paul déclare qu’on lui a mis « une écharde dans la chair » pour l’empêcher de s’enorgueillir. On ne nous dit pas ce qu'était « l'épine », peut-être s'agissait-il d'une forme de maladie.

    LANCEZ LE GANT

    Au Moyen Âge, un gantelet était le gant d’une armure. Lancer son gant était une manière de défier quelqu'un en duel.

    LANGUE DANS LA JOUE

    Au XVIIIe siècle, mettre la langue dans la joue était un signe de mépris. On ne sait pas exactement comment parler avec la langue dans la joue a pris son sens moderne.

    POSÉ-DÉCOLLÉ

    Ce vieil adage vient probablement des navires naviguant dans des eaux peu profondes où ils pourraient toucher le fond marin puis repartir. Si tel était le cas, ils se trouvaient manifestement dans une situation dangereuse et incertaine.

    TOUCHER DU BOIS

    À l'époque celtique, les gens croyaient que des esprits bienveillants vivaient dans les arbres. En cas de problème, les gens frappaient à l’arbre et demandaient de l’aide aux esprits.

    N'AVEZ PAS DE CAMION AVEC

    Camion signifiait à l'origine troc et est dérivé du mot français « troquer ». À l'origine, si vous n'aviez pas de camion avec quelqu'un, vous refusiez de faire du commerce avec lui. Cela signifiait que vous refusiez d’avoir quoi que ce soit à voir avec eux.

    VRAI BLEU

    Cette phrase était à l'origine vraie sous le nom de Coventry Blue, car les teinturiers de Coventry utilisaient un colorant bleu qui durait et ne se lavait pas facilement. Cependant, la phrase a été raccourcie.

    TOURNER L'AUTRE JOUE

    Jésus a dit à ses disciples de ne pas exercer de représailles contre la violence. Dans Luc 6 : 29, il leur a dit que si quelqu’un vous frappe sur une joue, tendez-lui également l’autre joue.

    TOURNER UNE NOUVELLE PAGE

    Cela signifie prendre un nouveau départ. Cela signifie une feuille de page d'un livre.

    J'ai pris le coin

    On disait que les navires qui avaient franchi le cap de Bonne-Espérance ou le cap Horn avaient « franchi le cap ».

    U

    SUR LE PÔLE

    Le mât était le mât d'un navire. L'escalader était dangereux et, sans surprise, il fallait être un peu fou pour y monter volontairement. Donc, si vous étiez un peu en colère, vous étiez au sommet.

    W

    LES VERRUES ET TOUS

    Lorsque Oliver Cromwell 1599-1658 fit peindre son portrait, il ordonna à l'artiste de ne pas le flatter. Il a insisté pour qu'on lui peigne « les verrues et tout ».

    LAVE-MES MAINS DE

    Le gouverneur romain Ponce Pilate refusa d’être impliqué dans la mort d’un innocent (Jésus). Il s'est donc lavé les mains devant la foule, se dissociant ainsi symboliquement de l'exécution.

    PORTEZ VOTRE COEUR SUR VOTRE MANCHE

    Au Moyen Âge, les chevaliers qui combattaient lors de tournois portaient un symbole de leur dame sur leurs manches. Aujourd’hui, si vous exprimez vos sentiments clairement à tout le monde, vous avez le cœur sur la main.

    MOTS DE BELLE

    Cette phrase proviendrait d’une vieille croyance selon laquelle les belettes pourraient aspirer l’intérieur d’un œuf en laissant sa coquille intacte.

    PESER L'ANCRE

    Le « peser » est une corruption du vieux mot wegan qui signifiait porter ou soulever.

    JE SUIS ALLÉ À L'OUEST

    Autrefois, les criminels étaient pendus à Tyburn, à l'ouest de Londres. Donc si vous alliez vers l’ouest, vous alliez être pendu.

    LARGE PLACE DE PLACE

    Un poste d'amarrage est l'endroit où un navire est amarré ou ancré. Lorsque l'ancre était abaissée, un navire avait tendance à se déplacer sur le câble d'ancre, il était donc important de lui laisser une large place pour éviter les collisions. Aujourd’hui, donner une large place à quelqu’un, c’est l’éviter.

    bon gré mal gré

    On pense que cette expression est dérivée des vieux mots will-ye, nill-ye (ou will-he, nill-he) signifiant si vous le voulez ou non (ou s'il le veut ou non).

    GAGNEZ HAUT MAINS

    Ce vieux dicton vient des courses de chevaux. Si un jockey avait une longueur d'avance sur ses concurrents et était sûr de gagner la course, il pouvait se détendre et poser ses mains à ses côtés.

    LE BLÉ DE LA BALLE

    Dans le monde antique, le grain était lancé dans les airs à l’aide d’un outil appelé fourchette à vanner. Le vent séparait la partie comestible du grain (blé) de la partie plus légère et non comestible (paille). Dans Matthieu 3 : 12, Jean-Baptiste avertit que le jour du jugement, Jésus séparerait le bon grain de l’ivraie (les bonnes personnes des mauvaises).

    BOUC ÉMISSAIRE

    Le prince Édouard, plus tard Édouard VI, avait un garçon qui était fouetté à sa place chaque fois qu'il était méchant.

    ÉLÉPHANT BLANC

    Au Siam (Thaïlande moderne), les éléphants blancs ou pâles étaient très précieux. Le roi offrait parfois un éléphant blanc à une personne qu'il n'aimait pas. Cela peut sembler un merveilleux cadeau, mais c’était en fait une punition car cela coûtait très cher à garder !

    UN LOUP DANS L'HABILLEMENT DU MOUTON

    Dans Matthieu 7 : 15, Jésus a mis en garde ses disciples contre les faux prophètes en disant qu'ils étaient comme des « loups déguisés en brebis », apparemment désarmants.

  • Original Anglais Traduction Français

    OMG!!!

    I love it! Thank you so much for this awesome thread!!!

    As you already know...I was not born and raised in here so things can be very new and difficult for me to understand. This is one of the thing I am not familiar with and this will help me tremendously.  kiss kiss kiss

    OH MON DIEU!!!

    Je l'aime! Merci beaucoup pour ce fil génial !!!

    Comme vous le savez déjà... Je ne suis pas né et n'ai pas grandi ici, donc les choses peuvent être très nouvelles et difficiles à comprendre pour moi. C'est une chose que je ne connais pas et cela m'aidera énormément. kisskisskiss

  • Original Anglais Traduction Français

    I loved, "Cloud Cuckoo Land" and "Spinster" "Cock a Hoop" and now i know what it means when i see the bump in the cheek of a confident man tryna get my digits.. Tongue in Cheek haha! If i ever see it again imma poke it!

    Thank You wmmeden, those were great!

    J'ai adoré "Cloud Cuckoo Land" et "Spinster" "Cock a Hoop" et maintenant je sais ce que cela signifie quand je vois la bosse sur la joue d'un homme confiant qui essaie d'obtenir mes chiffres... Tongue in Cheek haha ! Si jamais je le revois, je le pousserai !

    Merci wmmeden, c'était super !

  • Original Anglais Traduction Français

    Love it wmmeden.

    "SENT TO COVENTRY" - still a very popular saying as are a lot of the ones you have posted.

    blue

    J'adore ça maintenant.

    "ENVOYÉ À COVENTRY" - toujours un dicton très populaire, comme le sont beaucoup de ceux que vous avez postés.

    bleu

  • Original Anglais Traduction Français

    Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey


    In the heyday of sailing ships, all war ships and many freighters
    carried iron cannons. Those cannon fired round iron cannon balls. It was
    necessary to keep a good supply near the cannon.

    The best storage method devised was a square based pyramid with one
    ball on top, resting on four resting on nine which rested on sixteen.
    Thus, a supply of thirty cannon balls could be stacked in a small area
    right next to the cannon.
    There was only one problem -- how to prevent the bottom layer from
    sliding/rolling from under the others. The solution was a metal plate
    called a "Monkey" with sixteen round indentations. But, if this plate
    was made of iron, the iron balls would quickly rust to it. The solution
    to the rusting problem was to make "Brass Monkeys."
    Few landlubbers realize that brass contracts much more and much
    faster than iron when chilled. Consequently, when the temperature dropped
    too far, the brass indentations would shrink so much that the iron cannon
    balls would come right off the monkey. Thus, it was quite literally,
    "Cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey!"

    Assez froid pour geler les couilles d'un singe en laiton


    A l'époque des voiliers, de tous les navires de guerre et de nombreux cargos
    portaient des canons en fer. Ces canons tiraient des boulets de canon ronds en fer. C'était
    nécessaire de garder un bon approvisionnement près du canon.

    La meilleure méthode de stockage conçue était une pyramide à base carrée avec un
    balle sur le dessus, reposant sur quatre reposant sur neuf qui reposait sur seize.
    Ainsi, une réserve de trente boulets de canon pourrait être empilée sur une petite zone.
    juste à côté du canon.
    Il n'y avait qu'un seul problème : comment empêcher la couche inférieure de
    glisser/rouler sous les autres. La solution était une plaque de métal
    appelé "Singe" avec seize empreintes rondes. Mais si cette plaque
    était en fer, les billes de fer y rouilleraient rapidement. La solution
    au problème de la rouille était de fabriquer des "Brass Monkeys".
    Peu de terriens se rendent compte que les cuivres contractent de plus en plus
    plus rapide que le fer une fois refroidi. Par conséquent, lorsque la température baissait
    trop loin, les empreintes de laiton rétréciraient tellement que le canon de fer
    les balles sortaient directement du singe. Ainsi, c'était littéralement,
    "Assez froid pour geler les couilles d'un singe en laiton !"

  • Original Anglais Traduction Français
    cheesy Very interesting, thank you.  thumbs_up
    cheesy Très intéressant, merci. thumbs_up

Réponse rapide

Veuillez saisir votre commentaire.

activités de LCB au cours des dernières 24 heures

Les messages les plus consultés du forum

tough_nut
tough_nut il y a environ 2 mois
11

Coinbets777 - Jetons gratuits exclusifs Nouveaux joueurs uniquement - États-Unis, OK ! 25  $ 30  $ 45 $ Jetons gratuits Comment réclamer le bonus : Les joueurs doivent s'inscrire via notre LIEN...
Coinbets777 Bonus exclusif sans dépôt

Dzile
Dzile Serbia il y a environ 16 jours
116

Bienvenue à un autre concours mensuel en argent réel ! Il fait chaud en juillet et le sera encore plus une fois que nous aurons lancé ce concours populaire, alors préparez-vous à gagner une...
Concours LCB de 500 $ en argent réel de juillet : testons les casinos !

František Kázmér
František Kázmér Slovakia il y a environ 2 mois
14

Code de pari gratuit de 25$ - BIGLEAGUE valorisé le 14.5.2024
Betwhale.ag Casino sans dépôt