Projets de loi sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet HR 2267, HR 2268 et HR 4976

2,048
vues
2
réponses
Dernier message fait il y a environ 13 ans par MommyMachine
IlovemyCat
  • Créé par
  • IlovemyCat
  • United States Jr. Member 68
  • actif la dernière fois il y a environ 7 ans

Les lecteurs de ce sujet ont également lu :

  • Revue du casino 88Star Bonus d'inscription/Live : Thaïlande - 200 % jusqu'à 20 000 ฿ Bonus d'inscription de recharge : Thaïlande - 30 % jusqu'à ฿1000 Bonus d'inscription - Thaïlande :...

    Lu

    Bonus et promotions du casino 88Star

    1 511
    il y a environ 2 mois
  • Max Vegas Casino - Tours gratuits exclusifs Nouveaux joueurs uniquement - les joueurs allemands sont les bienvenus ! 28 tours gratuits pour April Fury et la Chambre des Scarabées Comment obtenir le...

    Lu

    Max Vegas Casino - Tours gratuits exclus...

    8 870
    il y a environ 2 mois
  • Vous recherchez des jeux de machines à sous en ligne de Popiplay ? Chaque fois qu'il y aura un nouveau jeu de Popiplay, nous mettrons à jour ce fil de discussion. Popiplay est une marque de jeux...

    Lu

    Nouvelles machines à sous en ligne de Po...

    5 527
    il y a environ 2 mois

Veuillez ou s'inscrire pour poster ou commenter.

  • Original Anglais Traduction Français

    Internet Gambling Regulation Bills H.R. 2267, H.R. 2268 and H.R. 4976

    I have an idea. Myself and many others who follow these things are betting that H.R. 4976 that Congressman Jim McDermott (D-WA) has introduced, and was testified on Wednesday; a 'companion bill' to Congressman Barney Frank's (D-MA) H.R. 2267 and H.R. 2268 is not going to go anywhere. We'll look at some reason why later.

    Assuming they can actually get rid of ludicrous modifications like the McDermott bill which would tax not only income but actually levy a percentage onto each bet, and assuming that the good Representative Frank can return his bill to its original purpose which was ostensibly to let Americans do as they see fit with their own money without being afraid of arrest and to regulate online gambling so people don't have to be afraid of getting ripped off or taken advantage of… if they can clean it up and make it right… Here's my idea and it's fighting fire with fire.

    We can assume that a banking bill will be passed before the 4th of July. Representative Frank who heads up the Committee on Financial Services has assured us that he has cleared his calendar for June to make sure this happens. This is must pass legislation, much as the Security and Accountability For Every Port Act of 2006 (or SAFE Port Act) was a couple of years ago. See where this is going? Yup!


    Let's just play the same slimy game that Leach, Goodlatte, Frist, and Kyl played on that fateful night in 2006 when they inserted the UIGEA earmark as Congress was on the eve of recess. Right before they convene for their patriotic (campaign) trips home lets slip a little earmark into the Banking Bill that looks a whole lot like Rep. Frank's undiluted original Internet Gambling Regulation and Tax Enforcement Act of 2009, but lets spiff it up a bit to patently legalize any form of gaming transaction at the interstate and international level unless it is prohibited by State law.

    Problem solved! No need to repeal the UIGEA as it only applies to illegal gambling, which at present is sportsbetting. (According to Federal Law and Federal Court Case Law as far as anyone knows.)

    Now back to why H.R. 4976 isn't or at least shouldn't go anywhere. It sucks. Plain and simple. First the Feds would collect a 2ax on any bet I placed at a licensed casino, and my state would collect another 6f they chose to and they would choose to. Please note I'm not talking about taxing income; the bill would apply a levy, a fee, on each wager… where is that 8oing to come from? You guessed it, straight off the Return to Player percentage (RTP) and straight onto the House Advantage. Is that a wolf in sheep's clothing? I can easily see on-land casinos supporting this portion as it effectively cripples the online competition's ability to compete.

    Of course the bill would tax my winnings as well… I wouldn't mind that too much as long as I could 'income average' my casino wins and losses over a three year period… but that's another matter all together.

    The 8enalty for operating online is of course in addition to the income taxes any US based (and possibly facing) operation would be forced to pay. (Under the current Frank bill casinos must agree to be under US jurisdiction to be licensed so we might assume that means they would be subject to US taxation.) The current players on land who will move into the online sector would surely be glad to absorb or pass on the 8oss for a couple of years until they get established and figure out how to get their exemptions - protectionist measures for good American Corporate Citizens.

    And then there is the ludicrous provision that taxes an unlicensed (read offshore) casino 50f my deposits. Lovely, just lovely!

    I really do applaud Rep. Frank's efforts but I'm afraid they just aren't going to come to much for the little guy who likes to play online - and diluting the original intent of his bill with this companion bill by Congressman McDermott may pick up a vote here and there (there were 70 on board as of Wed, 05/19/10) but it seems to be just another chip chip chip away catering to the existing on-land Moguls.


    The following is Chairman Frank's testimony as prepared for delivery:

    "Chairman Levin, Ranking Member Camp, thank you for the opportunity to testify today. H.R. 2267, the Internet Gambling Regulation, Consumer Protection and Enforcement Act, creates a legal framework for licensing and regulating online gambling and is designed to work in tandem with Mr. McDermott's bill, the subject of today’s hearing.

    In 2006, the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act (UIGEA) was enacted, which restricted the use of the payments system for Americans who sought to gamble online. I believe that it is an inappropriate interference on the personal freedom of Americans, and should be undone.

    H.R. 2267, is designed to protect consumers without restricting their freedom. I have always believed that it is a mistake to tell adults what to do with their own money. Some adults will spend their money foolishly, but it is not the purpose of the Federal Government to prevent them legally from doing it. We should ensure that they have appropriate consumer protections and information, but otherwise allow people to pursue activities that they enjoy which do not harm others. As John Stuart Mill said in his essay, On Liberty in 1869:

    "The only freedom which deserves the name is that of pursuing our own good in our own way, so long as we do not attempt to deprive others of theirs, or impede their efforts to obtain it. Each is the proper guardian of his own health, whether bodily, or mental or spiritual. Mankind are greater gainers by suffering each other to live as seems good to themselves, than by compelling each to live as seems good to the rest."

    I am encouraged to have the strong support of my lead Republican cosponsor on this legislation, Congressman Ron Paul of Texas.

    I have also been very pleased to have strong support for this legislation from the Ranking Republican and former Chairman of the Homeland Security Committee, Peter King, whose concern for public policies that protect us against terrorism is well known to many of us. His support for this bill is very important.
    American consumers who wish to gamble online are currently without safeguards against fraud, identity theft, underage and problem gambling and money laundering. Some operators adhere to rigorous regulatory regimes in foreign jurisdictions, but U.S. customers have no local recourse if they have a problem.

    And, more to the point for today's hearing, billions of dollars in taxes – both under existing law and those that would be established under Mr. McDermott's bill – remain uncollected. Enacting these bills would bring this industry out of the shadows, benefit consumers and ensure that all of the revenue does not continue to exclusively benefit offshore operators."

    According to a press release by the House Financial Services Committee, Barney Frank Chairman;

    Laudable efforts, but this writer is no where near convinced that Mr. Frank's side of the Rotunda can prevail as there are actually far more pressing things for Congress to be addressing and the other side of the House has nothing to lose by blocking this legislation.

    I suggest they craft a workable earmark and slip the willy into the Banking Bill at the last minute before the 4th of July, or just before summer recess on August 9th. We'll just call it 'fair is fair' and the House edge.

    Contributing Article Writer: lojo


    Editorial Comment:
    Summarization Of Current Internet Gambling Regulation Bills:

    H.R.2267 - Internet Gambling Regulation, Consumer Protection, and Enforcement Act


    Official Summary
    5/6/2009--Introduced.Internet Gambling Regulation, Consumer Protection, and Enforcement Act - Grants the Secretary of the Treasury regulatory and enforcement jurisdiction over the Internet Gambling Licensing Program established by this Act. Prescribes administrative and licensing requirements for Internet betting. Prohibits any person from operating an Internet gambling facility that knowingly accepts bets or wagers from persons located in the United States without a license issued by the Secretary. Requires the Secretary to assess:
    (1) fees against licensee institutions to cover the cost of administering this Act; and
    (2) specified civil money penalties upon licensees or other persons for willful violation of this Act or related regulations. Cites safeguards required of licensees, including:
    (1) tax collection related to Internet gambling;
    (2) safeguards against fraud, money laundering, and terrorist finance; and
    (3) safeguards to combat compulsive Internet gambling. Requires the Secretary and any qualified state or tribal regulatory body to prescribe regulations for:
    (1) development of a Problem Gambling, Responsible Gambling, and Self-Exclusion Program;
    (2) a list of persons self-excluded from gambling activities at licensee sites; and
    (3) a program to alert the public to the existence, consequences, and availability of the self -exclusion list.Prohibits a person who is prohibited from gambling with a licensee from collecting any winnings, or recovering any losses that arise as a result of prohibited gambling activity.Shields a financial transaction provider from liability for engaging in financial activities and transactions on behalf of a licensee, or involving a licensee, if such activities are in compliance with federal and state laws. Permits states and Indian tribal authorities to opt-out of Internet gambling activities within their respective jurisdictions. Prohibits electronic cheating devices. Subjects violators of this Act to civil and criminal penalties.

    H.R.4976 - Internet Gambling Regulation and Tax Enforcement Act of 2010


    Official Summary
    3/25/2010--Introduced.Internet Gambling Regulation and Tax Enforcement Act of 2010 - Amends the Internal Revenue Code to:
    (1) impose an Internet gambling license fee on Internet gambling operators and an additional tax on unauthorized bets or wagers;
    (2) require such operators to keep daily records of gambling deposits and file informational returns identifying themselves and the individuals placing bets or wagers with them;
    (3) require operators to pay state and Indian tribal governments a 6ee on gambling deposits;
    (4) require withholding of tax on net Internet gambling winnings and on the gross amount of winnings of nonresident aliens; and
    (5) extend the excise tax on wagers to include wagers placed with the United States or any commonwealth, territory, or possession by a U.S. citizen or resident. Directs the Secretary of the Treasury to make grants to states to carry out an American Heritage Program through state arts agencies. Allocates .5f the tax revenues attributable to Internet gambling to the American Heritage Block Grant Fund to finance the American Heritage Program. Amends the Social Security Act to establish the Transitional Assistance Trust Fund to finance state plans for transitional education and job training assistance to individuals who are, or were formerly, in foster care. Allocates 25f the tax revenues attributable to Internet gambling to the Trust Fund.

    H.R.2268 - Internet Gambling Regulation and Tax Enforcement Act of 2009


    Official Summary
    5/6/2009--Introduced Internet Gambling Regulation and Tax Enforcement Act of 2009 - Amends the Internal Revenue Code to:
    (1) impose an Internet gambling license fee on Internet gambling operators and an additional tax on unauthorized bets or wagers;
    (2) require such operators to file informational returns identifying themselves and the individuals placing bets or wagers with them;
    (3) require withholding of tax on net Internet gambling winnings and on the winnings of nonresident aliens; and
    (4) extend the excise tax on wagers to include wagers placed within the United States or any commonwealth, territory, or possession by a U.S. citizen or resident.


    Projets de loi sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet HR 2267, HR 2268 et HR 4976

    J'ai une idée. Moi-même et beaucoup d'autres qui suivent ces choses parions que le HR 4976 que le membre du Congrès Jim McDermott (D-WA) a présenté et a témoigné mercredi ; un « projet de loi complémentaire » aux HR 2267 et HR 2268 du député Barney Frank (D-MA) ne mènera nulle part. Nous examinerons pourquoi plus tard.

    En supposant qu'ils puissent réellement se débarrasser de modifications ridicules comme le projet de loi McDermott qui taxerait non seulement les revenus mais prélèverait en fait un pourcentage sur chaque pari, et en supposant que le bon représentant Frank puisse ramener son projet de loi à son objectif initial qui était ostensiblement de laisser les Américains faire comme ils l'entendent avec leur propre argent sans avoir peur d'être arrêtés et de réglementer le jeu en ligne afin que les gens n'aient pas à avoir peur de se faire arnaquer ou d'en profiter… s'ils peuvent faire le ménage et arranger les choses… Voici mon idée et c'est combattre le feu par le feu.

    On peut supposer qu'un projet de loi bancaire sera voté avant le 4 juillet. Le représentant Frank, qui préside la commission des services financiers, nous a assuré qu'il avait libéré son calendrier pour le mois de juin afin de s'assurer que cela se produise. Il est nécessaire d’adopter une loi, tout comme la loi sur la sécurité et la responsabilité pour chaque port de 2006 (ou SAFE Port Act) l’était il y a quelques années. Vous voyez où cela mène ? Ouais!


    Jouons simplement au même jeu gluant auquel Leach, Goodlatte, Frist et Kyl ont joué lors de cette nuit fatidique de 2006 lorsqu'ils ont inséré la marque de l'UIGEA alors que le Congrès était à la veille des vacances. Juste avant de se réunir pour leur voyage patriotique (de campagne), glissons une petite note dans le projet de loi bancaire qui ressemble beaucoup à la loi originale non diluée de 2009 sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet et l'application des taxes du représentant Frank, mais agrémentons-la un peu pour légaliser de manière manifeste toute forme de transaction de jeu au niveau interétatique et international, à moins qu'elle ne soit interdite par la loi de l'État.

    Problème résolu! Il n'est pas nécessaire d'abroger l'UIGEA puisqu'elle ne s'applique qu'aux jeux illégaux, qui sont actuellement les paris sportifs. (Selon la loi fédérale et la jurisprudence de la Cour fédérale, à notre connaissance.)

    Revenons maintenant à la raison pour laquelle HR 4976 n'est pas ou du moins ne devrait aller nulle part. C'est nul. Clair et simple. Premièrement, les autorités fédérales collecteraient 2ax sur tout pari que je placerais dans un casino agréé, et mon État collecterait 6f supplémentaires s'ils le souhaitaient et qu'ils choisiraient de le faire. Veuillez noter que je ne parle pas d'imposer le revenu ; le projet de loi appliquerait un prélèvement, des frais, sur chaque pari… d'où vient-il ? Vous l'aurez deviné, directement avec le pourcentage de retour au joueur (RTP) et directement avec l'avantage de la maison. Est-ce un loup déguisé en mouton ? Je peux facilement imaginer que les casinos terrestres soutiennent cette partie, car elle paralyse effectivement la capacité de la concurrence en ligne à rivaliser.

    Bien sûr, le projet de loi taxerait également mes gains… Cela ne me dérangerait pas trop tant que je pouvais « faire la moyenne » de mes gains et pertes de casino sur une période de trois ans… mais c'est une autre affaire.

    La pénalité pour les opérations en ligne s'ajoute bien sûr aux impôts sur le revenu que toute entreprise basée aux États-Unis (et éventuellement confrontée) serait obligée de payer. (En vertu de la loi Frank Bill actuelle, les casinos doivent accepter d'être sous la juridiction américaine pour obtenir une licence, nous pouvons donc supposer que cela signifie qu'ils seraient soumis à la fiscalité américaine.) Les joueurs actuels sur terre qui se lanceront dans le secteur en ligne seraient sûrement heureux d'absorber ou laisser passer les 8oss pendant quelques années jusqu'à ce qu'ils s'établissent et trouvent comment obtenir leurs exemptions - des mesures protectionnistes pour les bonnes entreprises citoyennes américaines.

    Et puis il y a la disposition ridicule qui impose un casino sans licence (lire offshore) à 50f de mes dépôts. Charmant, tout simplement charmant !

    J'applaudis vraiment les efforts du représentant Frank, mais j'ai peur qu'ils ne soient pas très utiles pour le petit gars qui aime jouer en ligne - et diluer l'intention initiale de son projet de loi avec ce projet de loi complémentaire du membre du Congrès McDermott pourrait choisir un vote ici et là (il y en avait 70 à bord le mercredi 19/05/10), mais cela semble être juste un autre chip chip chip pour répondre aux besoins des bosses terrestres existantes.


    Voici le témoignage du président Frank tel que préparé pour la livraison :

    "Président Levin, Ranking Member Camp, merci de m'avoir donné l'occasion de témoigner aujourd'hui. HR 2267, la loi sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet, la protection des consommateurs et son application, crée un cadre juridique pour l'octroi de licences et la réglementation des jeux en ligne et est conçue pour fonctionner en tandem avec M. Le projet de loi McDermott, sujet de l'audience d'aujourd'hui.

    En 2006, la loi UIGEA (Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act) a été promulguée, limitant l'utilisation du système de paiement pour les Américains souhaitant jouer en ligne. Je crois qu’il s’agit d’une ingérence inappropriée dans la liberté personnelle des Américains et qu’elle doit être annulée.

    HR 2267, est conçu pour protéger les consommateurs sans restreindre leur liberté. J’ai toujours pensé que c’était une erreur de dire aux adultes quoi faire de leur propre argent. Certains adultes dépensent leur argent de manière stupide, mais le but du gouvernement fédéral n’est pas de les empêcher légalement de le faire. Nous devons veiller à ce qu'ils bénéficient de protections et d'informations appropriées pour les consommateurs, mais permettre par ailleurs aux gens de poursuivre les activités qu'ils aiment et qui ne nuisent pas aux autres. Comme le disait John Stuart Mill dans son essai On Liberty en 1869 :

    « La seule liberté qui mérite ce nom est celle de poursuivre notre propre bien à notre manière, pourvu que nous ne cherchions pas à priver les autres du leur, ni à entraver leurs efforts pour l'obtenir. Chacun est le gardien de sa propre santé. , qu'ils soient corporels, mentaux ou spirituels. L'humanité gagne plus à se laisser vivre comme bon lui semble, qu'à s'obliger chacun à vivre comme bon lui semble aux autres.

    Je suis encouragé de pouvoir compter sur le ferme soutien de mon principal co-parrain républicain sur cette législation, le membre du Congrès Ron Paul du Texas.

    J'ai également été très heureux de bénéficier du ferme soutien à cette législation de la part du Républicain de rang et ancien président du Comité de la sécurité intérieure, Peter King, dont beaucoup d'entre nous connaissent bien le souci des politiques publiques qui nous protègent contre le terrorisme. Son appui à ce projet de loi est très important.
    Les consommateurs américains qui souhaitent jouer en ligne ne disposent actuellement d’aucune protection contre la fraude, le vol d’identité, le jeu problématique des mineurs et le blanchiment d’argent. Certains opérateurs adhèrent à des régimes réglementaires rigoureux dans des juridictions étrangères, mais les clients américains n'ont aucun recours local en cas de problème.

    Et, plus pertinent encore pour l'audience d'aujourd'hui, des milliards de dollars d'impôts – tant en vertu de la loi actuelle que de ceux qui seraient établis en vertu du projet de loi de M. McDermott – restent non perçus. L'adoption de ces projets de loi sortirait cette industrie de l'ombre, bénéficierait aux consommateurs et garantirait que tous les revenus ne continuent pas à bénéficier exclusivement aux opérateurs offshore.

    Selon un communiqué de presse du House Financial Services Committee, Barney Frank, président ;

    Des efforts louables, mais cet auteur est loin d’être convaincu que le côté de la Rotonde de M. Frank peut l’emporter car il y a en réalité des choses bien plus urgentes que le Congrès doit aborder et l’autre côté de la Chambre n’a rien à perdre en bloquant cette législation.

    Je suggère qu’ils élaborent une enveloppe réalisable et glissent leur foutu dans le projet de loi bancaire à la dernière minute avant le 4 juillet, ou juste avant les vacances d’été du 9 août. Nous l'appellerons simplement « juste, c'est juste » et l'avantage de la Chambre.

    Auteur de l'article contributeur : lojo


    Commentaire éditorial :
    Résumé des projets de loi actuels sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet :

    HR2267 - Loi sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet, la protection des consommateurs et leur application


    Résumé officiel
    06/05/2009--Introduit. Loi sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet, la protection des consommateurs et leur application - Accorde au secrétaire au Trésor la compétence de réglementation et d'application sur le programme de licences de jeux sur Internet établi par cette loi. Prescrit les exigences administratives et de licence pour les paris sur Internet. Interdit à toute personne d'exploiter un établissement de jeu sur Internet qui accepte sciemment des paris ou des paris de personnes situées aux États-Unis sans licence délivrée par le secrétaire. Nécessite que le secrétaire évalue :
    (1) les frais imposés aux institutions titulaires d'un permis pour couvrir les coûts d'administration de la présente loi ; et
    (2) des sanctions civiles pécuniaires spécifiées à l'encontre des titulaires de permis ou d'autres personnes pour violation délibérée de la présente loi ou des règlements connexes. Cite les garanties requises des titulaires de permis, notamment :
    (1) perception de taxes liées aux jeux de hasard sur Internet ;
    (2) des garanties contre la fraude, le blanchiment d'argent et le financement du terrorisme ; et
    (3) des garanties pour lutter contre le jeu compulsif sur Internet. Exige que le secrétaire et tout organisme de réglementation étatique ou tribal qualifié prescrivent des réglementations pour :
    (1) l’élaboration d’un programme de jeu problématique, de jeu responsable et d’auto-exclusion ;
    (2) une liste des personnes auto-exclues des activités de jeu sur les sites titulaires de licence ; et
    (3) un programme visant à alerter le public de l'existence, des conséquences et de la disponibilité de la liste d'auto-exclusion. Interdit à une personne à qui il est interdit de jouer avec un titulaire de licence de percevoir des gains ou de récupérer des pertes résultant de activité de jeu interdite. Protège un fournisseur de transactions financières de toute responsabilité s'il s'engage dans des activités et des transactions financières au nom d'un titulaire de licence, ou impliquant un titulaire de licence, si ces activités sont conformes aux lois fédérales et étatiques. Permet aux États et aux autorités tribales indiennes de se retirer des activités de jeu sur Internet au sein de leurs juridictions respectives. Interdit les appareils électroniques de triche. Soumet les contrevenants à la présente loi à des sanctions civiles et pénales.

    HR4976 - Loi de 2010 sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet et l'application des taxes


    Résumé officiel
    25/03/2010--Introduit. Loi de 2010 sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet et l'application des taxes - Modifie l'Internal Revenue Code pour :
    (1) imposer une redevance de licence de jeu sur Internet aux opérateurs de jeux sur Internet et une taxe supplémentaire sur les paris ou mises non autorisés ;
    (2) exiger de ces opérateurs qu'ils tiennent des registres quotidiens des dépôts de jeux de hasard et déposent des déclarations d'informations identifiant eux-mêmes et les personnes plaçant des paris avec eux ;
    (3) exiger que les opérateurs versent aux gouvernements des États et des tribus indiennes une somme de 6ee sur les dépôts de jeu ;
    (4) exiger la retenue à la source sur les gains nets des jeux d'argent sur Internet et sur le montant brut des gains des étrangers non-résidents ; et
    (5) étendre la taxe d'accise sur les paris pour inclure les paris placés aux États-Unis ou dans tout État du Commonwealth, territoire ou possession par un citoyen ou un résident américain. Ordonne au secrétaire au Trésor d'accorder des subventions aux États pour mener à bien un programme du patrimoine américain par l'intermédiaire des agences artistiques de l'État. Alloue 0,5 f des recettes fiscales attribuables aux jeux sur Internet au American Heritage Block Grant Fund pour financer le programme American Heritage. Modifie la loi sur la sécurité sociale pour créer le Fonds fiduciaire d'assistance transitoire pour financer les plans de l'État en matière d'éducation de transition et d'aide à la formation professionnelle pour les personnes qui sont, ou étaient autrefois, en famille d'accueil. Alloue 25f des recettes fiscales attribuables aux jeux sur Internet au Fonds fiduciaire.

    HR2268 - Loi de 2009 sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet et l'application des taxes


    Résumé officiel
    06/05/2009 - Introduction de la loi de 2009 sur la réglementation des jeux sur Internet et l'application des taxes - modifie l'Internal Revenue Code pour :
    (1) imposer une redevance de licence de jeu sur Internet aux opérateurs de jeux sur Internet et une taxe supplémentaire sur les paris ou mises non autorisés ;
    (2) exiger de ces opérateurs qu'ils déposent des déclarations d'informations les identifiant eux-mêmes et les personnes qui placent des paris ou des paris avec eux ;
    (3) exiger la retenue à la source sur les gains nets des jeux d'argent sur Internet et sur les gains des étrangers non-résidents ; et
    (4) étendre la taxe d'accise sur les paris pour inclure les paris placés aux États-Unis ou dans tout État du Commonwealth, territoire ou possession par un citoyen ou un résident américain.


  • Original Anglais Traduction Français

    Interesting stuff, thanks for posting.



    :-*

    Des trucs intéressants, merci pour la publication.



    :-*

Réponse rapide

Veuillez saisir votre commentaire.

activités de LCB au cours des dernières 24 heures

Les messages les plus consultés du forum

MelissaN
MelissaN Serbia il y a environ 2 mois
60

Eternal Slots Casino - Bonus exclusif sans dépôt Nouveaux joueurs uniquement - États-Unis, OK ! Montant : 77$ Comment réclamer le bonus : Les joueurs doivent s'inscrire via notre LIEN et saisir...
Bonus exclusif sans dépôt d'Eternal Slots Casino

Sylvanas
Sylvanas Serbia il y a environ 15 jours
112

Êtes-vous prêt à remporter davantage de prix en espèces et à tester les casinos en ligne ? Ce mois de juin, nous avons des candidats passionnants, comme Decode Casino, un site convivial pour...
Concours LCB de 500 $ de juin 2024 en argent réel : testons les casinos !

tough_nut
tough_nut il y a environ 2 mois
3

Lion Slots Casino - Bonus exclusif sans dépôt Nouveaux joueurs uniquement - USA OK ! Montant : 40$ Comment réclamer le bonus : Les nouveaux joueurs doivent s'inscrire depuis notre LIEN et...
Bonus sans dépôt exclusif aux machines à sous Lion